Feral dogs hunting Kangaroo

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moosenoose

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I do think of the puppies, the kittens, the piglets & all those other feral things out there. I particularly like the little pigs...delicious!! :D Haven't tried puppy yet :lol:
 

beastcreature

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I'm curious for those who shoot feral dogs whether you distinguish a difference between Dingoes & feral dogs that have come from domestic stock or whether you shoot regardless?
 

champagne

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I'm curious for those who shoot feral dogs whether you distinguish a difference between Dingoes & feral dogs that have come from domestic stock or whether you shoot regardless?

There are very few pure dingos left on main land australia and any dog seen is shoot.
 

baker

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Hypothetically if there were a 'safe' number of pure Dingoes left?
Would all depend on the area that the 'pure' dingoes are found in. Dingoes are not universally protected species in Australia and it varies between each state as to their protection status. In Queensland they are protected inside of National parks and other protected areas such as State forests and conservation parks (in saying this there is one park in Northern Queensland where they are being removed to help protect an endangered wallaby species). Anywhere outside of these areas they are a declared pest and its perfectly fine to hunt them pure or not. There are also very few ways to distinguish pure dingoes from hybrids and wild dogs. Main one I know is through skull morphometrics which is not possible in the field and without the skull.
Cheers Cameron
 

beastcreature

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Would all depend on the area that the 'pure' dingoes are found in. Dingoes are not universally protected species in Australia and it varies between each state as to their protection status. In Queensland they are protected inside of National parks and other protected areas such as State forests and conservation parks (in saying this there is one park in Northern Queensland where they are being removed to help protect an endangered wallaby species). Anywhere outside of these areas they are a declared pest and its perfectly fine to hunt them pure or not. There are also very few ways to distinguish pure dingoes from hybrids and wild dogs. Main one I know is through skull morphometrics which is not possible in the field and without the skull.
Cheers Cameron

That's what interests me Cameron, the contradictory nature of their prosecution/preservation.
 

baker

Well-Known Member
There are several factors that will be affecting how they are protected. One of them is how they are currently classified. Currently dingoes (Canis lupus dingo) are just a sub-species of the grey wolf the same as domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris). The current classification makes it more difficult to declare them as native species. Also how long should a species that has been introduced to the country be declared native? Dingoes have only been in Australia for the last 5000 years max. Is this a long enough time for them to be native? Another part of their prosecution is how they affect livestock farmers, especially sheep. In certain areas they cause a large problem and loose of profit by them hunting livestock so they are often shoot on sight.
The following is a quote from an email after I was talking to one of my lecturers at university on the classification of dingoes. Hopefully this quote will be able to give some insight into the current contradiction in their protection status.
"I think there is nothing wrong in choosing to conserve a sub-species, or even a small population in a small area in one place and controlling it in another if it compromises a more important conservation priority in that other place. And that is exactly what we do with dingoes now, whether we call them species or subspecies. What we must do, however, is recognise that we do this, and the reasons why we do it. In a mature society we need to recognise that we have an all pervasive effect on "nature" and that we choose that effect for a number of cultural reasons from providing livestock for consumption to providing a quality of life with options to "go bush and check it out". "
Cheers Cameron
 
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