Found a Baby Pigeon!

Discussion in 'Other Animals and Invertebrate' started by Pythonlovers, Apr 5, 2013.

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  1. Pythonlovers

    Pythonlovers Active Member

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    Hi everyone Ashleigh here,

    So this morning we had landscapers over doing our garden and they where pulling all the dead fronds off the ferns, one of the dead fronds had a nest on it and a baby pigeon fell out!
    I have put the little guy in a box with a towel in our room with the heater on so he is nice and toasty, now my only issue is what to feed it!

    Here are some photos. I'm 99% sure it's a Pigeon!

    IMG_2040.jpg IMG_2039.jpg
     
  2. Shotta

    Shotta Very Well-Known Member

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    maybe you could try some sort of hand rearing mixture insectivore mix
    lol its either a pigeon or a real ugly canary
     
  3. They're seed eaters, and not that easy to feed at that age because the parents pump the food from their crops down the throat of the baby. You may get a feeding response by lightly pressing the sides of the beak (it will flutter its wings and lunge to receive the food). I used to raise baby Senegal and Chinese turtledoves sometimes, but had to do it one seed at a time (get some mixed large parrot seed, and pick the biggest ones out (I avoided sunflower seeds)). It can be a bit time consuming, but a full crop two or three times a day is all it takes, and they develop really fast. I got them to pick on their own by placing a shallow dish of seeds in front of them, and picking the seeds up in my fingers and trickling them back to the dish - it stimulates their interest and they pick at the falling seeds. They don't know to swallow them for the first day or two, but get the hang of it soon enough. You may want to incorporate a bit of calcium powder into the seed as well.

    Probably a dove by the way...

    Jamie
     
  4. Pythonlovers

    Pythonlovers Active Member

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    Sorry Pythoninfinite, not used to all this bird talk!
    What do you mean by a full crop?
     
  5. Lachie3112

    Lachie3112 Not so new Member

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    I know what you could feed that to hahaha.

    I think this baby pigeon is between 5-12 days old, baby birds of this size will not last very long without parents. Since there is probably no chance of returning it to its nest I suggest you read this:

    Source: Granivores - Parrots, Pigeons, and Doves - Fauna Rescue SA Inc.

    This will not be an easy task unless you are an experienced person who has looked after many birds. I'm sorry but this bird will most likely die.
     
  6. oOLaurenOo

    oOLaurenOo Well-Known Member

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    OK, so thats a little dove (Not a native) They are pretty bullet proof and easy to rase. First off, if you want to raise it, head down to a pet shop and buy a baby bird rearing mixture. Next you'll need some syringes, you should be able to buy them from your local vet for very cheap. When I raise them I use something called a J loop. I cut the end off so its a thin soft tube which attaches to the end of the syringe. When feeding, gently hold the head up and open the beak, insert the tube into the beak about a few centre metres down, its really important that you do this. If you don't, and just put the food into the beak they can very easily get the food into there lungs and die. Feed 3 or so times a day, Feed until the crop is firm, but not hard. :)
    I have raised dozens of these guys. They are good fun. :)
     
  7. Lachie3112

    Lachie3112 Not so new Member

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    Crop is like a sac where food is stored before digestion. (Well that's the simplest way of describing it)
     
  8. oOLaurenOo

    oOLaurenOo Well-Known Member

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    On, and make sure they are warm. DONT ever feed if they are cold. If they feel warm and seem active, they are at a good temp, if they feel cold and aren't very active or responsive they are cold. If they are breathing quickly or panting they are too hot. :)
     
  9. oOLaurenOo

    oOLaurenOo Well-Known Member

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    Or alternatively you could make a new nest and put it back. Its very likely that the parents will take it back
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2013
  10. Pythonlovers

    Pythonlovers Active Member

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    Wow everybody, thank you so much for all your help! I'm at work now so I will relay all this information to Jesse! We will try our best to keep this little guy alive!
    And if all else fails... I know two hungry Green Tree Pythons....
     
  11. This won't happen with a dove, so don't try it. All the helpful info you have been given should work well, the negatives - such as "it will most likely die" - forget them until you've tried. Although of no consequence in the scheme of things, challenges like this are enormously beneficial to your overall skills as an animal manager, and if you succeed you will have added another arrow to the quiver of experience you have.

    The crop is basically the first stop for the food when it is ingested - it's a bag that sits in front of the breast, and it is obvious when it is empty or full. In fact, if the bird was fed by its parents this morning, it may still have seeds evident in it - carefully feel the area in front of the breastbone between your fingers - if it has a gritty feel, or you can feel stuff in there, that's the crop.

    Jamie
     
  12. Lachie3112

    Lachie3112 Not so new Member

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    Sorry if I came off as negative, I wasn't trying to be negative, rather just saying that be prepared for it not to live. I only mention it because I gave someone advice like this once. The animal died and they got all cranky that I neglected to mention its' odds were stacked against it.

    tl;dr Don't give up hope, but don't have too much hope either.
     
  13. solar 17

    solar 17 Guest

    A cropping needle has got to be one of the handiest tools that "anybody" with snakes or birds could own IMO because someday you are going to need one (straight away) :) B
     
  14. Wing_Nut

    Wing_Nut Well-Known Member

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    It looks like a common racing pigeon to me. But it is definitely a dove/pigeon and the basic husbandry is the same.

    Hand raising them from that age is quite simple however you will need a syringe (at least 10mm dia) and you cut the end off. This creates an artificial beak and the squab will drink from it, usually pretty redily. You push it over the birds beak and this replicates the parents. As the bird grows you may need a bigger syringe. I soak chicken rearing crumbles in hot water (not boiling) and mix 1ml of natural yougurt to the mix and feed around 32-34C, however a bought hand raising mix (1 part water one part mix) is very good to (Roudybush works great). At that age (5-7 days) you need to feed them around 15ml of this every six hours. For the first few days make the mix quite loose as they are susceptible to dehydration at that age. By two weeks they should be having about 40ml per feed and you don't need to increase it after that. At this stage they are very eager to feed and care must be take as they will lunge at the syringe. At 20 days old they will start pecking at seeds and by 28 they can be weaned onto a seed diet. A suitable temp for raising them at this age is around 37-38C.

    I have done this successfully many times.

    Regards

    Wing_Nut
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2013
  15. Yes, it's always good to be mindful of the worst outcomes when dealing with animals! It can be a bit tedious for a few days with these doves, but I remember one in particular that we raised when I was at school, for about 18 months after we released it, it would fly down onto my , or my mother's, head every time one of us went down the street. Very cute, and quite rewarding "feel-good" moments...

    Jamie
     
  16. Being Melbourne and found in vegetation, I'd say most likely one of the exotic doves, Senegal or Necklace. They make really flimsy nests in low vegetation.

    J
     
  17. Wing_Nut

    Wing_Nut Well-Known Member

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    In my experience, these types of birds are very hardy, very easy to raise and I would expect that there is a pretty good chance this bird can survive. I have a hen that I raised in this manner who does exactly as Jamie says, it will fly to me and sit on my shoulder whenever it can. She is now 6 years old.

    Regards

    Wing_Nut
     
  18. cathy1986

    cathy1986 Very Well-Known Member

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    If you dont know what a crop is then maybe best get it of to a vet or wildlife carer and let them do it

    from Cathy :)
     
  19. oOLaurenOo

    oOLaurenOo Well-Known Member

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    A vet or wildlife carer won't take it because its not a native. Like everyone is saying, they are very hardly little buggers. You will be fine. :)
     
  20. She now knows what a crop is Cathy, so the process of learning has begun already. Why should not knowing what a crop is mean that you pass the problem to someone else and stay in the dark forever yourself???

    I might add that most of my experiences were pre cover-all-bases hand rearing mixes were available, hence my primitive reponse initially lol! I've since done many parrots with a range of top-quality hand rearing mixes and they are both convenient and excellent.

    Jamie
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 5, 2013
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