Gecko requirements

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by BredliFreak, Oct 21, 2015.

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  1. BredliFreak

    BredliFreak Well-Known Member

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    Hi all,

    I reckon I should get some geckos, and these are the ones we can keep in the ACT:

    Gekkonidae *****ly Gecko Heteronotia binoei
    Thick-tailed Gecko Underwoodisaurua milii
    Robust Velvet Gecko Oedura robusta
    Tryon's Velvet Gecko Oedura tryoni
    Southern leaf-tailed Gecko Phyllurus platurus
    Marbled Gecko Phyllodactylus marmoratus
    Stone Gecko Diplodactylus vittatus
    Pygopodidae Common Scaly Foot Pygopus lepidopodus
    Inornate Legless Lizard Delma inornata
    Black-headed Scaly Foot Pygopus nigriceps

    I would like to know requirements i.e

    Heating, humidity temps etc.
    Food
    Enclosure size
    Good substrate
    anything else worth knowing about these guys!

    Bare in mind they will need some form of heating, especially in winter (bearing in mind this is CANBERRA we are talking about!).

    Thanks,
    Bredli
     
  2. baker

    baker Well-Known Member

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    Purchase yourself a copy of "A guide to Australian geckos and pygopods in captivity" by Dr Danny Brown. This book will cover any and all queries you have on the care of all the species you have just listed.

    Cheers Cameron
    [h=1][/h]
     
  3. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    Agree with what Cameron said. I always suggest the thicktails as a first gecko, because the others are escape artists.
     
  4. BredliFreak

    BredliFreak Well-Known Member

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    I've been eyeing that book for a while now but now I will definitely buy it! I was keen on the thickies because they are the closest to Nephrurus, and I have the perfect tank for a pair or trio (trying to convince parents to let me breed them). I wasn't as keen on the marbleds as we have a local population of them around the house so I don't really need a captive one. I was keen on the velvets, leaftails and the hooded scalys as well.

    Bredli
     
  5. mad_at_arms

    mad_at_arms Very Well-Known Member

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    That's a big list and a big ask for others to provide all the required info regarding keeping those species. If you are keen on keeping any of them, the research you do into those species will be valued learning.
    That said thick tails are a good introduction to geckos. They are pretty hardy and compare to other species have keeping requirements that are easier to meet compared to some of the others.
    On another note: since when has Marbled geckos been know as Phyllodactylus marmoratus? I thought they were Christinus marmoratus.
     
  6. BredliFreak

    BredliFreak Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, the scientific names are a bit oudated... I mean, shinglebacks are still apparently Trachydosaurus >.<

    Thanks for that, I reckon thickies are my first option but I am keen on the platurus in particular as well. On a side note, is there any threads with a good tutorial on how to make a DIY incubator?

    Bredli
     
  7. ronhalling

    ronhalling Subscriber Subscriber

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    @BredliFreak, A couple of years ago another member with the handle Crazy_Snake08 put a thread in the DIY section about building a good cheap incubator from an old bar fridge, i saved it for future use and will now copy it here for you on the understanding that all kudos for this incubator goes to Crazy_Snake08, it is the best step by step instructions with pictures i have seen to date, hope it helps. :) ..................Ron

    after clicking on the word doc you should find the executable link on the bottom left side of this thread :)
     

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    Last edited: Oct 22, 2015
  8. BredliFreak

    BredliFreak Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for that, do you know if it would work for geckoes?

    - - - Updated - - -

    Also, could you house two thickies and a pygo in the same tank, or would the thickies eat it?
     
  9. mad_at_arms

    mad_at_arms Very Well-Known Member

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    As a beginner keep to one species per enclosure. There are some species that will co-habitat, but most the time that's another level of keeping. Lets walk before trying to run.
     
  10. ronhalling

    ronhalling Subscriber Subscriber

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    As far as i know eggs are eggs, find out what the optimum incubation temps are for the "Gecko's" set that on the thermostat and Bob's your Uncle or Fanny is your downfall whichever works for you lol. :) ....................Ron
     
  11. mad_at_arms

    mad_at_arms Very Well-Known Member

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    Bar fridge will work fine. You will need to drill a hole in the back to feed the heatcord and temp sensor into it, pretty easy job.
    If you only have a few geckos breeding a polystyrene box will suffice. A couple of bottles filled with water in the incubator will help stabilize the temperature and lessen fluctuations.
     
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