Hatchling at cool end of enclosure?

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by Great Dane, Jun 18, 2019.

  1. Great Dane

    Great Dane New Member

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    Hi! I know I’m probably over reacting but I just want to be sure-
    I bought home a hatchling spotted python a couple hours ago and put it in the tub I have setup for it. It seemed to settle in a hide in the cool end of the enclosure fairly quickly. When I put it in it was cold as ice, should I move it to the hot end or just let it be and hope it eventually finds it way there? I’ve got a 13litre tub with a 5watt heat mat stuck to the bottom of one end (gets to about 35 degrees belly heat)

    Also is belly heat enough? Should I be using any type of lamp? Like a low wattage ceramic bulb or something? Because air temp is about 25 degrees, and seems really cold?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    Floor heat only is fine for a Spotted, it's all I'd use these days. I definitely wouldn't be using a heat lamp on a 13 litre tub - very dangerous. I wouldn't ever use a ceramic bulb for anything or recommend anyone to. 25 degrees isn't cold. Wild Spotted Pythons are out actively doing their thing in air temperatures below 25 degrees even without convenient 35 degree hot spots to use.

    One possibility for your snake choosing the cool hide is that 'about 35 degrees' is a bit over 35, and that hide is too hot. I usually shoot for low 30s for Antaresia hot ends. But, it has only been a couple of hours. Don't stress, give the snake time to settle in and explore the thermal options over the next day or few and see how it goes :)
     
  3. LilithLeChat

    LilithLeChat Active Member

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    If you don’t have an IR temperature gun, I’d suggest you get one. It will give you far more accurate reading of the surface temperatures at each end. As Sdaji said, the temperature at the hot end may indeed be more than 35 degrees.
     
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  4. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    Definitely good advice on the IR thermometer gun. These are just about an essential tool for reptile keepers, especially newer ones. They help you learn about temperature (which all reptile keepers should do, something many neglect), they're extremely handy for keeping a close eye on temperatures which your eyes can't do unassisted, and they're also just very cool gadgets to play with. Many people think 'the temperature is 28 because the thermostat is set to 28' or have similar misunderstandings of the situation. IR thermometers are so handy to deal with this, and these days they're very cheap, literally around 90% cheaper than when I was first looking at them.
     
  5. nick_75

    nick_75 Active Member

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    Have you provided a hide at the hot end as well as the cool end? Small snakes when feeling stressed forego heat and food in order to hide. If you have a hide on both sides of the temp gradient the snake can hide and thermoregulate. If the snake is still choosing the cool side to hide in, you have to trust that the snake knows where it needs to be. The IR gun is a sound investment for your own piece of mind.
     

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