ID - Skink found in Epping/Macquarie Park area NSW

Discussion in 'Reptile and Amphibian Identification' started by Multifoliate, Mar 4, 2014.

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  1. Multifoliate

    Multifoliate Not so new Member

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    Hi All

    Saw this pretty little thing on my fence, doesn't look like the everyday garden skink to me. Am I wrong? If not, what is it?

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  2. Ramsayi

    Ramsayi Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    Looks to me to be an eastern water skink Eulamprus quoyii
     
  3. -Peter

    -Peter Guest

    E. tenius I think
     
  4. Ramsayi

    Ramsayi Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    No arguments from me.What about this one?

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Bushman

    Bushman Very Well-Known Member

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    That's definitely a Bar-sided Skink (Eulamprus tenuis).
    The most distinguishing characteristic of this species is the broken, black, dorso-lateral stripe.
    They're semi-arboreal in habit, often climbing trees or in this case a brick fence. :)
    I've found them to be the most arboreal member of the "water skink" genus.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2014
  6. Multifoliate

    Multifoliate Not so new Member

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    Thanks all for sating my curiosity!
     
  7. -Peter

    -Peter Guest

    Looks like quoyii


     
  8. Ramsayi

    Ramsayi Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    Thanks Peter.
    Think we have both types in the yard.
     
  9. eipper

    eipper Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    The first lizard (sphenomorphid) is Concinnia tenuis. The second lizard (Sphenomorphid) put up by Ramsayi is Eulamprus quoyii. There are no skinks in Australia anymore.
     
  10. Lachie3112

    Lachie3112 Not so new Member

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    What? How can you make a claim like that?
     
  11. eipper

    eipper Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    Very easily Lachie, it's not a claim it's a result of a paper on the higher taxonomy of the animals formally known as scincids, better known as skinks
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2014
  12. -Peter

    -Peter Guest

    Here we go again, I'll never be able to keep up but it will be fun trying Scott.
     
  13. MesseNoire

    MesseNoire Well-Known Member

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    Would you be able to send me a link of the paper so I can (attempt) to read it?
    If they're not skinks they're now classified as sphenomorphid?
     
  14. eipper

    eipper Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    In Australia we have Sphenomorphids, Egerniids, Lygosomids and my personal favorite Eugongylids.

    The paper was published recently in Zootaxa, the paper is not in the open access category so there are no "free versions".

    cheers
    scott
     
  15. cheapthrillz

    cheapthrillz Not so new Member

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    These are all genera of the the family Scincidae ie. they are all Skinks, still.
     
  16. borntobnude

    borntobnude Guest

    They are very common in that area , I had two in my kitchen (ground floor office block -- commercial kitchen ) last week . the kitchen hand had a great time chasing them around 1/2 hour later they were released .
     
  17. MesseNoire

    MesseNoire Well-Known Member

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    I did a quick google. I am yet to read the full paper but the Scincidae family has been broken up into multiple smaller families, it seems. Just as Eipper mentioned.
     
  18. cheapthrillz

    cheapthrillz Not so new Member

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    I just got the new Cogger on Friday and it appears that it is out of date already because there is no mention of 'sphenomorphid'. How and where can I find out about these new divisions?
     
  19. eipper

    eipper Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

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    Cogger was out of date before it went to print. I should know I was talking with Hal the morning it went and we were discussing the Karma and Magmellia validity. There has been a new Aprasia, new Uperoleia, new Ctenophorus and a new Varanus described since. There has also been discussion about reserve tying a new genus within Pythonidae. It's the nature of the beast and there's plenty in the works.

    cheers
    scott
     
  20. -Peter

    -Peter Guest

    I used to get Tropical Fish Hobbyist updates for my book. They were a binder type and you could insert the new species pages as they came along. It is now totally out of date. It was a nice way of keeping a volume up to date though.
     
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