Legless lizard ID

Discussion in 'Australian Lizards and Monitors' started by Jaded, Feb 18, 2018.

  1. Jaded

    Jaded Not so new Member

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    Picked this little guy up, just wondering if anyone can ID exactly what kind of legless lizard this is.

    Thank you :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2018
  2. Foozil

    Foozil Well-Known Member

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    Its a scaly foot, not sure what species though. Nice little guy
     
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  3. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Where are you from @Jaded ??
     
  4. Jaded

    Jaded Not so new Member

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    Awesome thanks for that.

    I am in Sydney.


    Sent from my SM-N950F using Tapatalk
     
  5. Imported_tuatara

    Imported_tuatara Well-Known Member

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    Looks to be a common scalyfoot
     
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  6. Foozil

    Foozil Well-Known Member

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    Agreed
     
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  7. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    Plain colour form of the Common Scaly-foot Pygopus lepidopus.

    It identifies as a Pygopus species due to its robust body form with quite a blunt rounded snout and very obvious, slanted ear opening just above and behind angle of jaw. It will also posses large hind limbs flaps and a tail twice the length of the body (if original). The thin dark bar from the eye, through the lips and onto the throat and absence of dark bands across the nape or head identifies it as lepidopus.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2018

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