T+ Albino white lipped

Discussion in 'Reptile News' started by Herptology, Sep 14, 2020.

  1. Herptology

    Herptology Donator Donator

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    not sure why it’s got a black head, perhaps the genetics expert can fill us in :)

    2343388E-8108-41B2-B0D1-672B9D2A9F58.jpeg


    Here’s the adult

    25A31C5B-50AD-4599-92EF-3830FD14EAD5.jpeg
     
  2. Sdaji

    Sdaji APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    It has a dark head because individuals of this species have dark heads.
     
  3. Herptology

    Herptology Donator Donator

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    But doesn’t albinism strip dark pigment
     
  4. hamishh34

    hamishh34 Not so new Member

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    The normal white lipped has a darker head than body so it makes sense the body is a lighter colour. I was going to say the hatchy could just be in shed making head appear darker than the caramel/brown coloured head of the adult but the other photos on their site all have the same appearance. A nice looking mutation IMO.
     
  5. Sdaji

    Sdaji APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    You're thinking of typical/regular albinism, which eliminates melanin, which gives the mutants a somewhat 'negative image' look. T+ reduces rather than eliminates it, typically giving the mutants a washed out or 'hypo' look. Very different.

    If you had this species with a typical albinism mutation, the head would be the most pale part of the body (perhaps excluding the belly).
     
    JoshFast, Herptology and hamishh34 like this.

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