First snake

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ava c

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Ive been wanting to get a snake for a while and now can but I'm still a little unsure about a few things so I just need some tips.
I already know what type of snake I want children's, stimmy or spotted python, I have a licence, and a couple of enclosures (biggest is 90x45x45) and some hides and other necessities. I've been looking into everything but I'm mostly stuck on the best heating and what age of snake I should get, I've seen some people suggest for a first snake something a bit older but I'm not sure so any tips are welcome.
 

Sdaji

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I'd go for floor heat (personally I use head cords, most people would find heat mats easier). It works best, it's safest, cheapest, it's your best option.

Size/age is mostly personal preference. Personally I always prefer hatchlings. I find it satisfying watching them grow up, I feel a better connection with the snake when I have the memories of seeing it as a baby, raising it myelf, etc, rather than it just coming into my life as an adult with an unknown history. Again though, personal preference. Many people prefer a larger animal (I personally don't get it, but hey, when it comes to personal preference I don't have to) and I always find larger animals easier to sell. One other reason I prefer younger animals is that as a newbie you generally have a better chance of getting a high quality animal and as an experienced keeper you'll find it easier to get a high quality animal. People breed snakes and have to sell most of the offspring. When people are selling older animals it's often because there is some sort of a problem with the animal, or because the person realised snakes weren't for them or they weren't good at looking after snakes so they sell an animal which hasn't had the best of care. Sometimes you'll find great animals being sold by a person who happens to be moving abroad unexpectedly etc, or they just happen to have a snake which doesn't fit in with their plans, but it's more common for older snakes to be problem snakes and as a newbie it's more difficult to recognise them.

Great choice for a first snake! My first snakes were also Antaresia (though back them we didn't call them Antaresia) and decades later after working with thousands of snakes from pythons to colubrids, elapids, boas and vipers, I still find Antaresia some of the most enjoyable of all snakes to work with.

If you're interested, I'll be going through the Antaresia in about two weeks and I'll have a few of a range of ages and types available.
 

ava c

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I'd go for floor heat (personally I use head cords, most people would find heat mats easier). It works best, it's safest, cheapest, it's your best option.

Size/age is mostly personal preference. Personally I always prefer hatchlings. I find it satisfying watching them grow up, I feel a better connection with the snake when I have the memories of seeing it as a baby, raising it myelf, etc, rather than it just coming into my life as an adult with an unknown history. Again though, personal preference. Many people prefer a larger animal (I personally don't get it, but hey, when it comes to personal preference I don't have to) and I always find larger animals easier to sell. One other reason I prefer younger animals is that as a newbie you generally have a better chance of getting a high quality animal and as an experienced keeper you'll find it easier to get a high quality animal. People breed snakes and have to sell most of the offspring. When people are selling older animals it's often because there is some sort of a problem with the animal, or because the person realised snakes weren't for them or they weren't good at looking after snakes so they sell an animal which hasn't had the best of care. Sometimes you'll find great animals being sold by a person who happens to be moving abroad unexpectedly etc, or they just happen to have a snake which doesn't fit in with their plans, but it's more common for older snakes to be problem snakes and as a newbie it's more difficult to recognise them.

Great choice for a first snake! My first snakes were also Antaresia (though back them we didn't call them Antaresia) and decades later after working with thousands of snakes from pythons to colubrids, elapids, boas and vipers, I still find Antaresia some of the most enjoyable of all snakes to work with.

If you're interested, I'll be going through the Antaresia in about two weeks and I'll have a few of a range of ages and types available.
Yeah, I was thinking a heat mat since thats what I saw a lot of people suggest and say are more reliable.

The snake I'm looking at is a 1yr old platinum spotted python she's about 60cm and very chill, she's from a good reptile only shop, and they seem very knowledgeable and they said she'd be a great first snake since she won't be as fragile, is feeding well and has never bitten but younger snakes will sometimes get a bit snappy, she will double in size so I'll still get to see her grow. She is worth about $1,000 but she's being sold for $600 because someone sent her back because they didn't want her anymore (she has no issue). Another thing I'm not sure of is her price because I don't know if it's reasonable or not?
But if she's not the right snake for me I have a lot of other options since I'm not fussed about morphs or gender.
 

Mack86

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Go with a breeder, and my opinion : go with a hatchling šŸ˜Š Would never buy from a petshop again myself
 

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