CANE TOAD?!

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by Bl69aze, Nov 28, 2017.

  1. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Well-Known Member

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    so I live in Western Sydney and found this guy up the road, to me looks like a cane toad which would be a big problem.

    He’s bigger than he looks in the photo.

    [​IMG]

    If someone could help ID that’d be great and if it is a cane toad, what do I do?
     
  2. Foozil

    Foozil Active Member

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    I don't think this is a cane toad, they have bumpier skin and different colouration.
     
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  3. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Well-Known Member

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    I have looked at all frogs in nsw, and only a few could be somewhat similar like a fletchers frog. Any ideas on what you think it might be? Is it possible it’s some kind of tree frog that hasn’t changed colour yet?
     
  4. vampstorso

    vampstorso Subscriber Subscriber

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    Let it go, it's not a cane toad
     
  5. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Well-Known Member

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    Any reasoning behind that?

    Also where should we let it go? Lots of street cats around this place

    Edit: sorry if that came off as doubting you, I just want to know what you see that makes it not a cane toad :)
    I do believe you
     
  6. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    The colour, patterning (or lack thereof), skin type and body shape all make this definitely NOT a cane toad.

    What's with the making a big deal out of a cane toad as if it is the first one discovered in your state? Why would it be a 'Big problem'?

    If it was a cane toad ( which it isn't ), my advice would be to slam it as hard as you can against a hard object. Either that or dispatch it in which ever way you would dispatch any other pest animal.
     
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  7. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Well-Known Member

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    I haven’t Heard of reports of cane toads in Western Sydney.

    Thanks for the the details, where should I release it? And what type of frog do you think it is?
     
  8. vampstorso

    vampstorso Subscriber Subscriber

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    Here you can see photos of young cane toads. Notice amongst other things the stance is completely different, it has a much harsher distinct face and colouring.
    https://www.frogsafe.org.au/cane_toads/cane_frog.shtml


    Regarding how you can tell so easily, unfortunately I spent some time living in Qld...you get very well acquainted with them and hence identifying them.

    As for where to release it..well...I guess the first question is where did you find it that makes releasing it unsuitable? And what alternative are you suggesting?
     
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  9. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Well-Known Member

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    I found it chilling in the grass next to pathway on corner of busy road :s strange place, only water near by was a mud puddle
     
  10. vampstorso

    vampstorso Subscriber Subscriber

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  11. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    I am 100% certain there are cane toads in Western Sydney and have been for many years. They have made it all the way to Western Australia!
     
  12. Foozil

    Foozil Active Member

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    @Scutellatus - Not doubting you, but have you ever seen any? o_O
     
  13. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Subscriber Subscriber Power Seller

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  14. Foozil

    Foozil Active Member

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    I've read that article before, was just wondering if he had personally seen any.
     
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  15. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    It is not a Cane Toad because first and foremost it lacks the parotid glands above the shoulder. As you have already pointed out, its skin is too smooth and doesn’t have the warty lumps of toads. Also it lacks the bony ridges above the eyes that meet in a peak between the nostrils in Cane Toads. In addition, the hind feet lack any trace of webbing and the digits are too long. What you have is a Fletcher’s Frog.

    Most of our frogs, including the vast majority of tree frogs, are not aquatic but are terrestrial/arboreal. They only need bodies of water to reproduce. They rehydrate by burying into moist soil or leaf litter etc or utilising any available source of water (which is why Green Tree Frogs are often found in toilets during the dry up north). A puddle of water would be a bonus find for most species and then off they will go on their terrestrial roaming. So allow your frog to soak in water for a little while and then let it go, without handling it. A lot of frogs release the water they have taken in as a defence mechanism to put off a predator that may grab them, which includes human hands.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2017
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  16. Yellowtail

    Yellowtail Subscriber Subscriber

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    There has been concern that they may be breeding in the Caringbah area (Sydney suburb) following multiple sightings, they probably hitched a ride on trucks. Experts seem satisfied Sydney winters are too cold for them.
     
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  17. Imported_tuatara

    Imported_tuatara Well-Known Member

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    as someone who lives where there's no cane toads ever recorded(would be too cold, lol) i can identify them easily, they always look cranky, along with the glands, and bumpiness.
     
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  18. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Well-Known Member

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  19. ronhalling

    ronhalling Subscriber Subscriber

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    Before they Passed away in 2012 my Parents lived in Kingswood NSW (near Penrith) and in 6 months in the summer of 2011 they collected and handed in to Penrith Council 3 adult and 1 sub adult cane toads, so i reckon that pretty much proves it.

    [​IMG]
    ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) -ronhalling-
     
  20. Scutellatus

    Scutellatus Well-Known Member

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    No Foozil, I haven't personally seen any as I live in Qld. I have been following their migration South and West for many years though.
    In regard to people saying it is too cold where they live, cane toads will use burrows of any animal, some of which are quite deep, so I think they could probably live anywhere that frogs live by riding out cold winters in deep burrows. I personally used to flush them out of old rodent borrows as a kid and the filling of the burrow with water would take about 10mins or so. This was in Main Beach near Surfers Paradise back in the 80's.
     
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