Children's Pythons

Discussion in 'General Reptile Discussion' started by Cosmic wolfman, Feb 18, 2018.

  1. Cosmic wolfman

    Cosmic wolfman New Member

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    hey guys im DIYing everything for my enclosure, just a quick question.

    can you keep 2 childrens pythons in one 900x500x600mm tank
    and yes i know i will have to have separate feeding tubs and give each snake a quick mist spray to get rid of any rodent smell
     
  2. Flaviemys purvisi

    Flaviemys purvisi Very Well-Known Member

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    Short answer, No.
     
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  3. Foozil

    Foozil Well-Known Member

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    I personally wouldn't, but Aussie Pythons and other Reptiles on youtube and instagram keeps his snakes with other snakes, might be worth asking him if you want to know how he does it.
     
  4. Cosmic wolfman

    Cosmic wolfman New Member

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    So best to get 2 and keep them in seperate tanks.

    Ive heard that if they are from the same hatch you can do 2 in one tank
     
  5. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    No. You will always hear stories of how people have kept snakes together. For every one of those, there are 10 of people having one snake eat or attack the other. In reality, it is only a matter of time.
    Keep them separately, for their safety, and your peace of mind.
     
  6. Nerdhero

    Nerdhero Not so new Member

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    I think there are a few species that can coexist fine, garter snakes being one of them. But none of those are australian natives so i agree with the advice above.

    In the wild two pythons may interact with no troubles....but if they want they can always remove themselves from the situation. In a tank they cannot.
     
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  7. Rob

    Rob Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Last edited: Feb 19, 2018
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  8. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 19, 2018
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  9. SpottedPythons

    SpottedPythons Well-Known Member

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    If you haven't already bought the snakes, why not buy one first, then make another enclosure before you get another?
     
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  10. Stompsy

    Stompsy Subscriber Subscriber

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    If they are babies, just make two click clacks and slowly build up two nice enclosures while they grow. Problem solved. You’re welcome.
     
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  11. Foozil

    Foozil Well-Known Member

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    You should probably keep babies in small enclosures anyway. They can get pretty stressed in larger enclosures when small.
     
  12. Buggster

    Buggster Well-Known Member

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    It’s a big question that does come up a lot, and here’s my 2 cents...

    Short answer : no

    Long answer : depends


    So let’s get this straight- in the wild, snakes coexist together for the most part. You’ll more often than not find various species (of both predator and prey) living together harmoniously without all that much trouble.
    Thing about the wild is that, even in a relatively small area, there’s going to but dozens of levels, temp gradients, hides ect.
    It’s almost impossible to replicate these in captivity in a tiny box. You just simply can’t give the animals enough space, enough hides and enough heat gradients in a 90x60 box. Eventually animals kept in a small space will come into contact, and might (even accidentally) kill one another.

    I’ve seen and heard about some very interesting ‘reptile couples’ over the years that have gone successfully. One common thing they have is the ‘enclosure’ is bigger than my bedroom. They are absolutely huge and give the animals plenty of space to move away from one another and to enjoy their own favourite basking spots and cool places and hidey holes. I believe Taronga Zoo keeps their GTPs with Green Tree Frogs very successfully- owing to what I can only assume is the vast space they all have to move, and some very well fed animals. Is there a risk? Of course. Those snakes might one day decide froggy looks like a nice snack, but the risk is far less than keeping they same pairing in what most keepers will put a GTP in.

    And again with BTS- people will tell you not to keep them together in an enclosure as they can and will bite off each other’s tails and toes, but so many people have so much success cohabiting multiple blueys in a large outdoor pit. Still the risk? Yes. But again, so much less so than keeping them in a tank.


    And yes, maybe you’ll be among those lucky people who have cohabbed solitary animals their whole lives and gotten away without so much as a scratch. But you have to consider if it’s worth it. As easy as it would be for me to get my Stimmie a ‘permanent’ girlfriend to live with him full time, I’m not going to because I don’t want to come home to something gone wrong. If I could ever find the funds to convert my entire bedroom into a snake utopia however, I would have to reconsider :)
     
  13. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    I wouldn't do it these days, but I kept my first two snakes (Antaresia) together for over 10 years without any issues, and for a while I kept a third in with them. I've kept various species together including Australian colubrids, elapids and several python species, and personally never had any trouble.

    For every disaster you hear of there are many people keeping them together without any trouble, but there's still a potential for trouble and it's best not to. For me, the biggest reason is that cleaning and feeding is just so much more time consuming when you are dealing with two different animals. I prefer to spend a few seconds than a few minutes if I have the option.

    Your snakes, your choice.

    I once posted a picture on APS of six pythons of mine feeding in the same enclosure. I wish I could dig it up, but as I said, tasks which take more than a few seconds aren't appealing to me.

    ...cue the obvious joke if you want :p
     
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