Glass v's Perspex,,,,sliding v's swinging.

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by PappaSmurf, Jan 8, 2014.

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  1. PappaSmurf

    PappaSmurf Active Member

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    Ok so i'm building a new house for my Bredli. Yeah, yeah, i know it's the same cabinet that andynic07 has but i'm gunna try & do it a bit different.
    The one thing a really can't decide on is what doors to use for the centre opening. I have been leaning towards swing out doors as opposed to sliding for the greater access.
    Also debating with self about the glass v's perspex thing.

    Any comments welcome as i know there is a wealth of experience on here.


    [​IMG]
     
  2. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    What are your reasons for wanting greater access? A swinging door that size will have flex if made of perspex which may let your snake push its way out. Perspex scratches easily, attracts dust but insults better. I think sliding doors are cheaper and easier to do yourself as a lot of glass door hinges require a hole in the glass to attach. Price wise between glass and perspex there isn't a lot of difference I think.
     
  3. -Peter

    -Peter Guest

    I have Perspex doors on several enclosures, swing out doors work really well if you use the thicker stuff. You can also frame the thinner stuff up. I heat the screws and put them directly into the acrylic. For looks though glass is the way to go. Acrylic degrades over time, even the really the high grade stuff I use. Don't forget that if you put the sliders in properly you can lift out the glass to get full access. You can also get hinges for glass if that's the route you want to go down.
     
  4. Brownbird

    Brownbird Not so new Member

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    In my experience, perspex is better for DIY, much easier to cut, screw, etc. but it does scratch up over time and flex a bit. If you happen to have a glazier mate though.....
     
  5. Lawra

    Lawra Come here Squishy! Subscriber

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    Swinging doors all the way! I used sliding for my long enclosure and it's such a pain :/

    I prefer perspex just because it's cheaper to buy a whole sheet and cut it myself but yes it attracts dust like crazy and people have said it scratches easily.

    If you do choose perspex have a look at acrylic flex hinges for a frameless door. They look awesome and are used on SnakeFX tanks if you want to do a google search.
     
  6. PappaSmurf

    PappaSmurf Active Member

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    Thanks for the input guys & girls but i better clarify a couple of points.
    As for the swing out doors i meant double doors Andy, like the ones on her current house.
    Cost is NOT a factor, i don't want to do it on the cheap i want to do it properly.
    I do have a mate that's a glazier, in fact he's the manager there but again, cost isn't a factor.
    Will do some more research myself but please feel free to keep the info coming.
     
  7. -Peter

    -Peter Guest

    People seem to bring up flexing, if that's the case your using to thin a product. I use 6mm, 10 mm and 12mm. Never had flexing problems.
     
  8. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    If you are thinking about double doors then I would definitely use thicker perspex as peter suggest otherwise one door could flex in and one out a little giving you a biggish gap. The question will then be quality and whether you want to do it yourself. I really think glass looks a bit classier as the dust and scratches will show up on the perspex but perspex is a lot easier to work with. They both have their good and bad points and depending on what elements you put bigger emphasis on will decide which product is best. The other thing that you will need to think about is how you will keep the doors closed and how the centre gap will be filled (shouldn't be necessary if it is for your bredli). I think that it will turn out really nice with the thought you are putting into it.
     
  9. Porkbones

    Porkbones Well-Known Member

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    I'm liking this thread coz I'm tossing up on glass tracks or make up a couple of frames and then have 2 glass doors for an opening thts 1100 wide by 800 tall.still do t k ow what I'm going to do
     
  10. Chris82

    Chris82 Active Member

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    Hey pappasmurf,

    Glass all the way in my opinion! Easy to clean and when it is clean a much clearer viewing window to observe your critters.

    The more access to one enclosure the better I've found. I'd go with the double doors like you suggested.

    Chris
     
  11. KingSirloin

    KingSirloin Well-Known Member

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    As size and weight don't look like a problem, glass is a must. Two swing out doors would suit the style of the cabinet using either frameless glass doors with entertainment style 'push and release' catches (as long as they can be locked!) or frame them up to match the cabinet. I would never consider sliding doors or perspex for that size and style of furniture.

    I might also throw a suggestion of putting wooden doors at the top to provide a warm, dark hiding spot for it and drill a large hole for access.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014
  12. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    That is interesting. Are the push and release catches you talk about the magnetic ones and if so would they be strong enough to keep a large Bredli in? Also what are the reasons that you would not use sliding glass for this type of enclosure, I have used sliding glass doors on a similar one?
     
  13. KingSirloin

    KingSirloin Well-Known Member

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    A large snake would definitely be able to push them open, which is why I mentioned they would have be able to lock, not just magnetically close. I also think sliding doors would take something away from the look of the furniture but that's a personal choice I would make. Sliding doors would provide limited access but could be removed easily.
     
  14. PappaSmurf

    PappaSmurf Active Member

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    OK i've finally decided,,,,,,,,,i think,,,,,,,( it's a mongrel being an indecisive libran) to go sliding glass. Far easier for my limited experience with this type of thing & if i really want, can always change it down the track.

    Next question is heating. I am going to heat the right hand end as you look at it ( the one without all the holes) with a thermostat controlled 100w ceramic heat bulb.
    Is it better to mount vertically from the top or horizontally from the rear or doesn't matter?
    Will i need any kind of heating in the other end?
    There will only be one basking shelf in the warm end, the other end will be a free climbing area.
    Will have a hide that used to be in her current house down below somewhere & a fair bit of fake vine etc; for her to get into. Do you think i'll need a high one as well?
    There will be plenty of lighting with a caged fluro in the centre section & strip led's in either end.
    Should i put the warm end light under the asking shelf so that it's also a bit darker for her up there?

    Man, some of this is hurting my head but i am LOVING the challenge.
     
  15. Chris82

    Chris82 Active Member

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    Without a doubt vertically from the roof. You don't want all your heat pointing out wards onto the glass then the heat just dissipates!

    If your building a shelf why not mount the ceramic underneath the shelf so that the heat from the ceramic is also utilised in a similar way to a heat mat. So your python will get heat from above and underneath!

    no heating needed at the other end. This will defeat the purpose of a gradient
     
  16. PappaSmurf

    PappaSmurf Active Member

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    Never thought of putting the heat under the shelf but if i did she could have belly heat up top or bask on a branch underneath. Hmmmmmm, ok, but if i did that i wouldn't be able to mount vertically. Maybe sideways from the end would be ok?
     
  17. Chris82

    Chris82 Active Member

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    Yep exactly. I'm picturing the shelf being 3/4 the way up the side so it would be a snug type of fit for your bredli. There should be enough space to mount vertically I would think? Not sure how you'd want the end resu
     
  18. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    I think that 100w would be overkill. I use a 50 w halogen and that provides enough heat for a basking shelf 3/4 of the way up mine love basking out in the open and I do not provide hides anymore as it stopped using them but it likes secluded corners with foliage for time out. I would only mount a light or Che vertical for two reasons , they work better and the snake can't sit on top of the cage.
     
  19. PappaSmurf

    PappaSmurf Active Member

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    You are probably right with the overkill thing but it'll be on a thermostat so shouldn't overheat. Vertical from the top it is then. Never thought of the sitting on the cage bit.
    Just got back from hopefully the last shopping trip with glass & other bits & pieces. I know i said cost wasn't factor but holy hell it's added up quick.
     
  20. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    Yeah it does add up just like cars and bikes. Sorry to do this but one more thing to think about or at least trial, if your thermostat gets stuck on what temperature will your enclosure get in the middle of the day in the middle of summer? I think it might be right with the size you have but just give it a 24 hour 7 day test and check max/mins at each end.[​IMG]

    This is what I use, a bit more of a robust light.
     
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