AHG or native gecko?

Discussion in 'Reptile and Amphibian Identification' started by Licespray, Aug 6, 2019.

  1. Licespray

    Licespray Not so new Member

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    Found this fellow at work.
    Moved it so the butcher birds wouldn’t get it.

    28E60F92-A708-4898-9C6A-D4A762E98CCF.jpeg
     
  2. Herptology

    Herptology Active Member

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    I can’t see any bumps/spikes on its tail which is usually a sign of AHG
     
  3. nuttylizardguy

    nuttylizardguy Active Member

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    G.hyra I think. A native gecko.

    I only know this because I've got a couple of juvenile g.hyra dubias living inside my house and I had one in a tub to observe ( wife found it on kitchen bench and it hid in roach bait ), I had it for couple of weeks til it escaped when I was replacing the water dish with fresh water.

    Your's could be a g.hyra dubia judging form the colour and patterning of "spots".
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2019
  4. Bluetongue1

    Bluetongue1 APS Veteran APS Veteran

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    It is a native gecko of the Gehyra genus. The diagnostic features of this genus are the rounded expanded tips of the digits with a large claw emanating from the centre of its top surface on digits n1 to 4. The fifth digit lacks a claw and is often significantly smaller than the other digits.

    A geographic location is often very helpful in distinguishing species. Using colour pattern alone can be problematic, although it does definitely look like the Dubious dtella.

    Scalation can be utilised, as per the following from AROD website…
    Dubious dtella (Gehyra dubia) has subdigital lamellae that are undivided, though may be deeply notched; 9 or more subdigital lamellae on the expanded portion of the 4th toe. While the Eastern tree dtella (Gehyra versicolour) generally has 7 or 8 divided scansors under the expanded portion of the fourth toe; two pairs of enlarged chin shields and second infralabial notched.
     
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