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moosenoose

Legendary
The trouble is we live on an island literally surrounded by snakes but nobody bothers to learn the first aid associated with snake bite. Makes no sense to me. You mightn't as well bother learning to swim while you're at it (IMHO)
 

Wild~Touch

Very Well-Known Member
So sad ... BUT ... I beleive antivenom can only be administered in a hospital with an ICU and then after thorough monitoring of vital bodily functions.

Antivenom alone is not the magic cure for snakebite.

Just some stuff I learned after a close family member was bitten.

Prompt first aid is essential as already stated.
 

euphorion

Very Well-Known Member
people are stupid, learn first aid! not hard :/

but still, poor guy, poor family. if only, if only...
 

eipper

Very Well-Known Member
APS Veteran
I just submitted the below to the Courier mail website,

While snakebite death is tragic, surely information as to how avoid snakebite envenomation is pertinent as well.

In the two fatal Pseudonaja (Brown Snake) envenomations the victims were bitten while interfering with the snake. If they had avoided contact in the first place they would still be alive today. The details surrounding the Oxyuranus (Taipan) envenomation are unknown including how long the person took to die. There was a period of a number of hours that the person had not made contact and it is unclear as to how long it took for the person to succumb to the venom.

The Article incorrectly cited the Australian Venom Research Unit as an Institute.

The Spotted Brown Snake or Dugite Pseudonaja affinis is not the same as the Speckled Brown Snake Pseudonaja guttata. The former is from South Western WA and western South Australia, while the later is form Western QLD and the Northern Territory.

The Black Tiger Snake is no longer thought to be a taxonomically valid species.

The actual table of "most venomous" is infact incorrectly cited. The listing came from a table in Broad et al 1979 that listed the toxicity in mice of 20 Australasian snakes with 3 exotic species as controls. The actual most venomous snake species is still the same- the Inland Taipan Oxyuranus microlepidotus.

Antivenom should only be administered by trained people and usually only in a hosptial. This due to storage, complications surrounding treatment and other factors.

Regards,
Scott Eipper
 

Firepac

Well-Known Member
I can see a number of potential issues arising from ambos carrying antivenom. Firstly the question of identification. ID of the snake even if it was caught or killed would in the majority of cases have to be considered unreliable unless there is a genuine expert present and I don't mean enthusiastic all knowledgeable amateurs or bystanders. Even if a snake was correctly identified say as a copperhead...what antivenom should be given for a copperhead bite? So ambos would therefore also have to carry SVDK's to identify the immunotype the venom belongs to. There is then an additional delay for swabbing the bite site, incubation of the test vials for 10 mins at a recommended 22C - 24C, repeated washing of the vials (7-15 times), adding further reagents then observing colour change for upto 10 mins. All time consuming. Then there is the additional risk of AV being administered just on a positive result from the SVDK without any signs of clinical envenomation. ( I have first hand knowledge of this happening in a hospital. )

So to me first aid is the key, trap the venom at or close to the bite site buys the victim a LOT of time to get medical help and transportation to a hospital.
 

Echiopsis

Well-Known Member
He needs to push for more first aid training amongst the public and in school not this anvivenene rubbish. Its amazing how few people actually know correct snake bite first aid in a country where snakes are a part of life.
 

Monitor_Keeper

Suspended
Banned
I can see a number of potential issues arising from ambos carrying antivenom. Firstly the question of identification. ID of the snake even if it was caught or killed would in the majority of cases have to be considered unreliable unless there is a genuine expert present and I don't mean enthusiastic all knowledgeable amateurs or bystanders. Even if a snake was correctly identified say as a copperhead...what antivenom should be given for a copperhead bite? So ambos would therefore also have to carry SVDK's to identify the immunotype the venom belongs to. There is then an additional delay for swabbing the bite site, incubation of the test vials for 10 mins at a recommended 22C - 24C, repeated washing of the vials (7-15 times), adding further reagents then observing colour change for upto 10 mins. All time consuming. Then there is the additional risk of AV being administered just on a positive result from the SVDK without any signs of clinical envenomation. ( I have first hand knowledge of this happening in a hospital. )

So to me first aid is the key, trap the venom at or close to the bite site buys the victim a LOT of time to get medical help and transportation to a hospital.
+1
Taking off jewelry and bandaging the site will give you double the time alone.
 

JosPythons

Not so new Member
I agree Firepac, there would be quite a few issues with ambos carrying antivenene. I am an ambo and there is now way that I would ever want to carry snakebite antivenene. The Identification kits kits alone take far too much valuable time away from providing proper first aid and treatment of the person and an ambulance is most certainly not the place that you want to hang around in and take the time to identify the type of snake. I am pretty sure that ambos will never be given snakebite antivenene to administer but if it ever did come to that the ideal would be for them to have the Polyvalent and to only administer it if there are definite clinical signs of envenomation. Immediate and correct first aid for snakebite is the most appropriate form of treatment that is required by anyone that comes across somebody with a snakebite (as well as ambos), then immediate transport (preferably by ambulance) to a primary medical facility.


I can see a number of potential issues arising from ambos carrying antivenom. Firstly the question of identification. ID of the snake even if it was caught or killed would in the majority of cases have to be considered unreliable unless there is a genuine expert present and I don't mean enthusiastic all knowledgeable amateurs or bystanders. Even if a snake was correctly identified say as a copperhead...what antivenom should be given for a copperhead bite? So ambos would therefore also have to carry SVDK's to identify the immunotype the venom belongs to. There is then an additional delay for swabbing the bite site, incubation of the test vials for 10 mins at a recommended 22C - 24C, repeated washing of the vials (7-15 times), adding further reagents then observing colour change for upto 10 mins. All time consuming. Then there is the additional risk of AV being administered just on a positive result from the SVDK without any signs of clinical envenomation. ( I have first hand knowledge of this happening in a hospital. )

So to me first aid is the key, trap the venom at or close to the bite site buys the victim a LOT of time to get medical help and transportation to a hospital.
 
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