Is this scale rot?

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by MissBee90, Jun 17, 2018.

  1. MissBee90

    MissBee90 New Member

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    Hi fellow reptile owners. I've just noticed tonight that my stimmy has some red 'cut' looking scales and a pinkish tone to her belly that I've never seen before. I've done a bit of googling and am tossing up whether its scale rot or septicemia?

    Any ideas as to what it is and what to do/how to treat it until the vets open?

    Thank you in advance.

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    Last edited: Jun 17, 2018
  2. richyboa72

    richyboa72 Well-Known Member

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    I can't see the pics I'm afraid
    This normally occurs when the snakes in moist conditions for a long time

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  3. MissBee90

    MissBee90 New Member

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    I've edited the post, can you see it now?
     
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  4. richyboa72

    richyboa72 Well-Known Member

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    Yes I can now thanks,
    It could be scale rot, unless it's a burn from unprotected heat source, do you feed f/t or live, live feed can cause similar marks and worse .
    How long have you had the snake ?, if it's scale rot a weak betadine solution can be applied with cotton wool or soak for a bit in shallow rub but don't allow the snake to drink it, I had it once in a new snake I brought soon cleared up within a few weeks , I kept mine on paper too and made sure it was nice and dry, next shed should see most of it gone
    Good luck


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  5. Pauls_Pythons

    Pauls_Pythons Power Seller Power Seller

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    +1 richy's response.
    Difficult to tell from those pics. If it is scale rot its not a bad one.
     
  6. MissBee90

    MissBee90 New Member

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    I have a cage around the heat lamp so that my snakes dont make contact with it and feed them frozen rats/mice. I've had him for about 4 years now. I'll take him to the vet on Monday, just want to have an idea on what I'm dealing with otherwise I'll be thinking the worst case scenario. Thanks for your reply.
     
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  7. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    great that you have a cage around, however in some cases the cage can still get a bit hot... are you able to hold your hand on the cage without wanting to pull away?
     
  8. richyboa72

    richyboa72 Well-Known Member

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    Hi that’s good that your your heat source is protected and you feed f/t so at least this can be ruled out .you would be surprised how many people don’t protect there animals from the bulb,
    I would take him to vets and get it checked out like you have already said hopefully if it is that you have caught it nice and early
    What substrate is your stimmi on this normally occurs when the humidity is really high , them stick on dial types are rubbish and tend to stick on and give false readings
    The reason I asked how long you had him is if it had come straight from the breeder like that , you’d want to be on the phone to him/her, mine got couriered up to me like it , I was fuming and not cheap as she’s quite rare morph and turned out an absolute stunner now , they actually sent me some bettadine thru the post
    Keep us all posted and good luck

    Oh and if you have any other animals don’t let them near each other and sterilise your hands before and after use , standard practice anyway I know
    Cheers and good luck


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  9. richyboa72

    richyboa72 Well-Known Member

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    How did you get on the vets today, hopefully you got in ok, hopefully was just mild, thanks rich

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  10. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    As others have said. Scale rot is usually a husbandry issue, as richyboa has suggested, with damp substrate being one of the major causes. You've had the snake for quite a while, so just make sure that your management is up to scratch, - clean, dry substrate (very important), fresh water, appropriate temps and good food. Sometimes it arises because keepers think they need to spray to maintain "appropriate" humidity - even in Oz this is rarely a problem that needs additional humidity added to the enclosure. Carpets and Stimson's almost never need spraying - I could probably count on the fingers on one hand how many times I've done it in decades.

    Jamie
     
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  11. AnthonyL

    AnthonyL Not so new Member

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    Just curious, is this your opinion with GTPs also, re: the spraying?
     
  12. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    Sure is. I do keep the humidity up a bit more with baby GTPs, spray their tubs every three or 4 days, but the adults rarely get sprayed, maybe once every couple of weeks if i think of it, and usually if I know they are to shed within 24 hours. My feeling about feeding and spraying GTPs has long been that we feed them far too much because they are so inactive, and keeping them in a constantly highly humid, damp enclosure with almost no air movement, has to have an impact on long-term health. In the wild they are exposed to much more air movement, and although they may live in areas where humidity is relatively high, replicating that humidity in a stuffy, poorly ventilated enclosure where they get little exercise is not good for long-term health of any snake. My GTPs remain in good health, shed easily and completely, and are always hungry (which I consider a good sign...).

    Jamie
     
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