So my snake died :(

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by silent36, Aug 10, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. silent36

    silent36 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2012
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have a 3 yr old BHP femal

    I had fed her last night a rat that i had bought from a local pet store (frozen rat)
    she was fine this morning so i had gone out but i get a phone call froma house mate saying that my snake had regurgitated her rat and was violently moving about the cage .

    So i quickly came home and discovered she passed away she also had white spots over her entire body
    she has had no contact with any other snakes for at least 4 months so im stumped to why she has died im very upset
     
  2. sharky

    sharky Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2,005
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    SA
    So sorry to hear mate :(

    I don't have any experience in this field but your best option of finding out how and why she died would be to have an autopsy.

    All the best to you xxx
     
  3. jaspy

    jaspy Not so new Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2013
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chapel Hill
    Thats horrible to hear, sorry for your loss. I also have no experience in the VET field of herps sorry.
     
  4. Renenet

    Renenet Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2011
    Messages:
    2,523
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Cairns
    I'm sorry to hear you lost your snake. Do you have any photos of the white spots? If there's any chance you want to get a necropsy done, put the body in fridge rather than the freezer and organise it as soon as you can.

    Again, my condolences.
     
  5. champagne

    champagne Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2013
    Messages:
    600
    Likes Received:
    1
    photos of white spots?
     
  6. Pitttownboy

    Pitttownboy Active Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2013
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sounds like IBD with white spot fungus caused by mites
     
  7. longqi

    longqi Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2009
    Messages:
    2,903
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Bali indonesia
    Snakes with IBD show lots of signs before they croak it
    Doubt if any snake with IBD would feed the day before death
     
  8. Ramsayi

    Ramsayi Very Well-Known Member APS Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2003
    Messages:
    4,773
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Sydney
    You might be able to find out what went wrong if you get a necropsy done.If you are going down that track put the snake in a fridge and get it to a vet as soon as possible.It could have got internal damage from a rats tooth or claw etc along with heaps of other possibilities.
     
  9. Pitttownboy

    Pitttownboy Active Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2013
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
    Don't they feed then regurge
     
  10. Tobe404

    Tobe404 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2012
    Messages:
    948
    Likes Received:
    85
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    South Australia
    This is probably way off and had nothing to do with your BHPs death (white spots and all) but... How big was the Rat?
    Never the less I am sorry for your loss and I hope you at least end up finding some answers.
     
  11. Grogshla

    Grogshla Very Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2010
    Messages:
    3,320
    Likes Received:
    5
    so sorry to hear mate :(
     
  12. missilly

    missilly Not so new Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2013
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Grantham
    Sorry to hear thats awful. Hope you find answers soon. X
     
  13. Starter

    Starter Not so new Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2013
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Riverland SA
    My condolences, too ... but a picture of these white spots might be really interesting for the community here. Could you possibly still arrange for that? Also, a question from me as a beginner: What does BHP stand for? I just have a freshly skinned and very active young Bredli python slithering around my neck trying to strangulate me, huh - is BHP a Bredli Hybrid Python? (just a guess)

    As for frozen pet shop rats, my local pet shops keep telling me that the commercial suppliers breed the rats they sell in sterile and absolutely hygienic and disease-free conditions and their facilities are controlled and monitored - that's their standard response why they "can't" and won't buy any of my home-bred rats who are probably the happiest rats in the world ... I wonder what the breeding conditions at the commercial pet shop suppliers are really like?
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2013
  14. Pitttownboy

    Pitttownboy Active Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2013
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
    Black headed python
     
  15. Ramy

    Ramy Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2006
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Illawarra
    Black-Headed Python

    It also gives the stores the ability to hold their suppliers accountable if anything does go wrong. How much would it suck if your rats weren't frozen or stored right, and a few locals fed their snakes some slightly off rats... ANY ill effects would be the store's responsibility, and the pet shop can't deal with that risk (and I know it's minute).
     
  16. Starter

    Starter Not so new Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2013
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Riverland SA
    Question to the "slightly off rats" issue. I also breed guinea pigs. Occasionaly, though very rarely, it happens that I find a rat or a guinea pig dead which have not shown any signs of a disease. I usually assume that it was the cold or the heat or some cage mates squeezing them too much or they may have died in a fight with their cage mates, etc. And I put them into a plastic bag and into my freezer for possible later use as feeders. Is it indeed a too big risk to feed them to my snakes? I would guess that a few months of freezing plus the stomach acids of the snake should be able to reliably kill any possible disease agent.
     
  17. Pitttownboy

    Pitttownboy Active Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2013
    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    0
    In the wild these rodents would be first eaten anyway with survival of fittest etc so it shouldn't be a problem but personally I'd only feed them to monitors
     
  18. Marzzy

    Marzzy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Messages:
    871
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Sydney
    The guinea pig hair is really coarse and thick, I stopped feeding them after hearing about the hair clogging the intestines. I didn't feed my BHP for 4 weeks and they still pooed hair...
     
  19. Shouldn't be a problem at all - larger food items routinely begin to rot in a snake's stomach before the digestive juices can really get working. It can take weeks for a very parge meal to break down in the gut of a very large python - the giant species eat pigs, deer, goat etc and they don't break them down in a day or two.

    Jamie
     
  20. ingie

    ingie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2010
    Messages:
    824
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Brisbane QLD
    I don't believe commercial suppliers of rodents are kept pathogen/disease free and in sterile conditions. The shop probably just tells customers that so they think they are getting their money's worth for pet store prices, not that it would make a difference to quality if alternative backyard rat breeders were using good rats with strong immune systems. A lot of customers at pet stores will only buy all white rats too, and are really wanting rats to be incredibly neatly frozen, which commercial people are really good at.

    A frozen rat would have to be pretty messed up to actually make a reptile sick, also. If people have problems with their reptiles i feel it would be highly unlikely to be caused by a frozen rodent, and more likely something else to do with disease, genetic weakness or husbandry. Many reptiles will happily eat rotten food that they find, without health issues, including BHP's.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page