Why are reptile enthusiasts in Australia not allowed to keep exotic reptiles

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by Cunninghamskinks, Apr 8, 2014.

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  1. spud_meister

    spud_meister Active Member

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    Seriously? Look at Brown Tree Snakes in Guam, or Burmese Pythons in Florida. Australia has some very pretty snakes, and there's no need to run the risk of introducing invasive pests.
     
  2. MrThumper

    MrThumper Active Member

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    If they were allowed....I foresee a post in the future 'who the hell let these not native species into our country'


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  3. richoman_3

    richoman_3 Very Well-Known Member

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    Still dont understand why people would even want exotics
    we have some of the best reptiles in the world ... And we want to keep it that way
     
  4. Bushfire

    Bushfire Well-Known Member

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    While most of the arguments against are all have merit etc etc. The real reason why you cant have any is because that particular interest group has no real power or numbers. Although I argee with the current policy the only way to change it is to be part of a minor party in a hung parliament while holding the balance of power. If that ever happens you might get it through. The science and logic go out the window when the gov needs your support on something. There are hundreds of examples where this has happened at both state and federal levels.
     
  5. Beans

    Beans Guest

    So just say for example they goverment allowed us to keep exoctics.

    People would be like Awesome finally I can get the african rock python!

    Yay right? Nope. Imagine if everyone had an african rock python, and as hatchlings they escaped. Can you imagine the massive damage that would do to native animals?

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    Science and logic don't apply to the abbot gov haha
     
  6. cement

    cement Subscriber Subscriber APS Veteran

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    Theres no shortage of escaped pet snakes out there, just ask any relocator.

    I don't understand why anyone would want exotics.....not when we have our native jags and our native zeb's, they are the very bestestest.
     
  7. Bushfire

    Bushfire Well-Known Member

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    It may do damage it may not hopefully we never get the opportunity to know however the potential damage means little when politics are involved. I'll paint an extreme picture here but the point is very relevant. Say if I approach the Labour Party and say if you make it legal to keep exotics I can guarantee you an election win do you think they would say no way the environment comes first?? In nsw look at the pressure the shooters party put on gov, we now have hunting in NPs. Farmers in qld, they have cattle grazing in NPs. Loggers in tassie, a section of world heritage delisted. Dredging in world heritage area. In nsw because the community won against a mining company, gov decides to put economic benifits over everything else making enviro impacts basically useless.

    the point is just because it is the right thing to do it doesn't always mean that's the path taken. In saying all that I would be amazed if reptile keepers could unite and stand up for itself instead of the infighting, jealousy and divide we see today. Therefore although it's possible to happen it's more improble due to us keepers.
     
  8. Sean_L

    Sean_L Not so new Member

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    What Bushfire is saying is true. The reasons WE CANT are purely political.

    However the reasons WE SHOULDNT are what SHOULD be discussed.
     
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  9. Becceles

    Becceles Guest

    Here's another good reason. Because by allowing animals to be kept as pets - any animals at all - it relies on common sense, decency, and a good thought process. Unfortunately everyone claims to have these things. Reality is that so few do. Or at least, so few have enough to cover all necessary aspects, many have enough to get them through everyday life.
    By allowing these things it relies on people to do the right thing... which never EVER happens.
     
  10. Beans

    Beans Guest

    Very well said I agree with all points made

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  11. marcus0002

    marcus0002 Guest

    I fail to see how hunters shooting foxes and other ferels in national parks under direct supervision of npws rangers is bad for the environment.
     
  12. Retic

    Retic Almost Legendary

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    LOL. I bet that went over a few heads.

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    The simple fact is that if anyone in Australia wants an exotic species just ask around especially in Sydney. You can find quite literally any species you want as countless 1000's are being bred every year. There really is no need to legalise them at all, it wont affect the number in the country.
     
  13. Actually, your first statement is incorrect. The reasons for NOT keeping exotics are NOT purely political - the restrictions on importing exotic animals of all sorts are based on very sound scientific principles, and they were developed when politicians listened to the science and logic of people who knew more about the subjects than they did. That has all changed, and quite spectacularly so in the last eight months. If you want to make a case for the keeping of exotic reptiles, just use the terms "will benefit international trade" and you'll have this lot of charletans eating out of your hand...

    Never has the remaining fragile environment in this country been more under threat than it is now - dig it up, cut it down, cover the Reef with dredge spoil... who cares...

    Jamie
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 9, 2014
  14. champagne

    champagne Well-Known Member

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    The problem is people who aren't intelligent enough to not have their reptiles escape...

    I stated that there is some exotics that would be high risk. More damage is done from land clearing for housing, mining ect then any exotic reptile would do.

    Wouldn't a Darwin getting released in qld pose a bigger risk due to the chance of cross breeding with a coastal or jungle? The fact that parks and wildlife main focus is on the environment and not ''pet reptiles'', the sooner they realise these cross breeding risks and ban all none locality natives to your area the better...
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2014
  15. zulu

    zulu Very Well-Known Member

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    Most exotics such as corns have been here in captivity longer than most natives that are still plucked from the wild in some states and territories . The risk of deseases from natives spread to captive corns and boas and other exotics cannot be overstated.
     
  16. Becceles

    Becceles Guest

    How is a darwin cross breeding with a coastal or jungle going to threaten ANY native wildlife?
     
  17. champagne

    champagne Well-Known Member

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    yes it would threaten the pure coastal or jungle population genetically....
     
  18. These threads always bring out lots of opinions, theories and assertions which are then stated as facts, which can be quite misleading to newcomers in the reptile game. It seems some members here have a far better idea about Australia's biosecurity requirements than those actually working in the field.

    Of course Australia is going to be conservative with regard to the importation of non-domestic animals, given that the seemingly innocuous release of the Cane Toad has unleashed one of the biggest environmental catastrophes the country has ever seen. It is probably as bad as anything seen on the entire globe so far, and it hasn't stopped yet. And then we can go to Sparrows, Starlings, Mynahs... only in Perth suburbs can you wake up to the sound of honeyeaters and other native birds now, all the other capital cities are infested with these verminous species which have pushed all native species out. Perth, thankfully, is devoid of these invaders, thanks to the Nullarbor Plain and a concerted effort at the western edge of the Nullarbor to keep them out.

    If you want to keep exotics, move to the UK, as one member, a long-time critic of Australia's restrictive laws and a respondent in this thread, has done. Any popular species of pet reptile unlucky enough to escape in that part of the world won't last 12 months due to the unfavourable climate, and there is very little natural habitat left, so environmental concerns are few. Australia is regarded as "the home of reptiles" by many scientists. Most exotic species could find a niche in this country which would support their proliferation in the right circumstances. But I guess the grass is always greener, and there will always be people who want, want, want what they can't have.

    Why take the risk?

    Jamie
     
  19. Snowman

    Snowman Guest

    Couldn't agree more.. Then on the other hand you have over the top regulation. Lets not let the public keep and breed quolls or other native fauna that that could increase the survival of native animals.. As the cane toad marches west I'm sure there are many species that could be preserved in captive stock rather than letting them die out completely... Fortunately no control on cats so that should keep a health balance right! :?
    I get there isn't enough funding for all the needed projects and to captive breed animals. How are they missing the public that would do it for free!

    I really cant see much hope in sight for conservation.
     
  20. Becceles

    Becceles Guest


    And you think that corn snakes will threaten them less than cross breeding?
     
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