Problems with UV lights

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ameliasark

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hi all, i was just wondering if anyone has had any issues/experience with the ‘get your pet right’ T5 uv strip lights.
ive been using them over the past year or so and it’s been a disaster, i usually replace every 6 months or so but have had to replace/buy new 4 times in the past year.
my 3rd replacement globe blew this morning and i’m a bit over the constant money sink lol.
Anyone experienced something similar with this brand?
any recs for a quality alternative?
Ive got two of these lights on my hooded scalyfoots and jungle python (both bioactive so they need to be replaced asap)
 

Sdaji

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Just stop using them. Nothing in a bioactive enclosure including a Carpet of Scaly Foot needs UV.
 

ameliasark

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Just stop using them. Nothing in a bioactive enclosure including a Carpet of Scaly Foot needs UV.
Yeah, I'm honestly tempted - my reptile room is pretty dark so I'd need to replace them with at least a couple of LEDs for the plants.
As for the reptiles themselves, I know the carpet doesn't need it but I have noticed she seems a lot brighter and more active when they're on (I admit this could just be my imagination). When I was researching the Scaly Foots i couldn't find any decent care guides but the ones I did recommend UV. I figured it'd be better to be on the safe side, the breeder had them under UV too. If you know of anyone keeping them without that has had success I'd certainly be interested though!

I try to keep all my animals under UV even when it's not necessary just because my philosophy is that it can't hurt and it might turn out to be beneficial.

It's good to hear that someone with your experience doesn't think they're necessary though, I'll probably end up switching the pythons to LEDs :)
 

Sdaji

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I've bred generations of Hooded Scaly-foots and never used UV.
UV can be dangerous in multiple ways to both plants and animals.
 

Mack86

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I've bred generations of Hooded Scaly-foots and never used UV.
UV can be dangerous in multiple ways to both plants and animals.
Hey @Sdaji
If you had time I'd love to hear more about the dangers of using UV lights with snakes in particular. Very curious on this topic
 
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Sdaji

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Hey @Sdaji
If you had time I'd love to hear more about the dangers of using UV lights with snakes in particular. Very curious on this topic

It's very well known that UV is damaging to skin and particularly eyes. Reptiles are not immune. They are typically more robust with it than humans, but artificial UV is not the same as natural in terms of spectra and intensity, and in a box they don't always have the same ability to escape it.

Behaviourally it can be problematic because they live in a box where they are unable to escape it to the same extent that is possible in a natural situation. A reptile can typically get a long way away from UV during the day (such as deep in a burrow, several times further away from the UV than the entire length of an enclosure), and being right next to UV can make a reptile stressed. It's not unusual for hatchlings in particular to stress and refuse feed when UV is forced on them and for them to resume feeding when the UV is taken away.

This is just scratching the surface. It's a complete myth that 'UV can't hurt so I'll give it to them just in case'. It's not just a risk to your time and money budget.

Incidentally, plants don't utilise UV for photosynthesis and can be harmed or outright killed, even by natural UV from sunlight. UV is outright harmful to living things, it's literally something commonly used to sterilise things. Many animals can cope with it and in some cases do utilise it (humans included), but those same living things can be harmed or killed by it (humans included), and that's just talking about natural UV. Artificial UV can be even more dangerous.
 

Mack86

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It's very well known that UV is damaging to skin and particularly eyes. Reptiles are not immune. They are typically more robust with it than humans, but artificial UV is not the same as natural in terms of spectra and intensity, and in a box they don't always have the same ability to escape it.

Behaviourally it can be problematic because they live in a box where they are unable to escape it to the same extent that is possible in a natural situation. A reptile can typically get a long way away from UV during the day (such as deep in a burrow, several times further away from the UV than the entire length of an enclosure), and being right next to UV can make a reptile stressed. It's not unusual for hatchlings in particular to stress and refuse feed when UV is forced on them and for them to resume feeding when the UV is taken away.

This is just scratching the surface. It's a complete myth that 'UV can't hurt so I'll give it to them just in case'. It's not just a risk to your time and money budget.

Incidentally, plants don't utilise UV for photosynthesis and can be harmed or outright killed, even by natural UV from sunlight. UV is outright harmful to living things, it's literally something commonly used to sterilise things. Many animals can cope with it and in some cases do utilise it (humans included), but those same living things can be harmed or killed by it (humans included), and that's just talking about natural UV. Artificial UV can be even more dangerous.
This is really helpful information and it does make sense. I bought a UV light about a month ago knowing that yes my snake doesn't "need" it but perhaps providing it won't hurt to try and mimic nature as close as possible. He has fed once since I've had it on but not since. I know the cooler weather would most likely be the player here but it's interesting to know that perhaps providing that light could be off-putting to him as well. I haven't actually turned it on this week at all because I just felt like - if I was a snake just trying to hide out and I had that light shining directly above me would it piss me off and my answer was yes. Anywho, will try with it off for a bit and see how things go. Appreciate all that information!
 

ameliasark

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It's very well known that UV is damaging to skin and particularly eyes. Reptiles are not immune. They are typically more robust with it than humans, but artificial UV is not the same as natural in terms of spectra and intensity, and in a box they don't always have the same ability to escape it.

Behaviourally it can be problematic because they live in a box where they are unable to escape it to the same extent that is possible in a natural situation. A reptile can typically get a long way away from UV during the day (such as deep in a burrow, several times further away from the UV than the entire length of an enclosure), and being right next to UV can make a reptile stressed. It's not unusual for hatchlings in particular to stress and refuse feed when UV is forced on them and for them to resume feeding when the UV is taken away.

This is just scratching the surface. It's a complete myth that 'UV can't hurt so I'll give it to them just in case'. It's not just a risk to your time and money budget.

Incidentally, plants don't utilise UV for photosynthesis and can be harmed or outright killed, even by natural UV from sunlight. UV is outright harmful to living things, it's literally something commonly used to sterilise things. Many animals can cope with it and in some cases do utilise it (humans included), but those same living things can be harmed or killed by it (humans included), and that's just talking about natural UV. Artificial UV can be even more dangerous.
This is really interesting, and it makes sense that being in such close proximity could be doing more harm than good. Thank you for sharing I really appreciate the new perspective! I'll definitely be doing some more research on this and throw some LEDs on those two :)
 

Mack86

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This is really interesting, and it makes sense that being in such close proximity could be doing more harm than good. Thank you for sharing I really appreciate the new perspective! I'll definitely be doing some more research on this and throw some LEDs on those two :)
Dumb question, but the LED lighting is fine right? In terms of not hurting their eyes? I have LED lights that I turn on at night for a couple of hours and they are dimmable. I dim them right down because I'm paranoid of hurting his eyes 😅
I'm such a noob at this

I should also note that the LED's are OUTSIDE of enclosure in a light canopy not inside incase anyone is concerned about snake + adhesive.
 
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