• Check out the new Feedback and suggestions forum. This adds the ability to add ideas for the site and upvote/downvote them. It would be great to hear from you all in how we can boost site activity and who would like to assist with some exciting ideas from Rob and I.
Status
Not open for further replies.

Buggster

Well-Known Member
Hi guys!

Its that time of year again when im looking at snagging a new snake at next years Expo- and as of now I've narrowed my list down to a Diamond Python (or perhaps a Jungle, but I'm 100% certain it will be an arboreal species).

Just a few general questions- I would really appreciate any and all answers!

Enclosure:
What would be an appropriate enclosure size for an adult Diamond? I've heard all sorts of sizes are the 'best' for them and am wondering what would be a good size without being so big it can't fit through my front door!
I understand these guys are an arboreal species, so height it more important that floor space to them. In saying that, would these guys appreciate an UTH system and a hide on the ground?
Are there any ready-to-buy enclosures you guys can reccomend, or would a custom made be my best bet?

Heating:
I live in NSW, and there were previously hundreds on Diamonds in my area (about 30-40 years ago) before all the big trees were ripped up and built over. There are regular sightings of Diamonds in a reserve about 10 mins up the road, however these are (sadly) becoming less frequent as they are being pushed away by more development.
In knowing that wild Diamonds are living in my area, and having heard that Diamonds do not tolerate being overheated, am I correct in thinking that having only a daytime basking light would be best for these guys and allowing temps to drop to ambient room temp during the night (and during particularity hot days)?

Handling:
I know these guys are a staff favourite for bringing out and doing shows at the zoo I volunteer at and seem to be very docile and curious for the most part, but in general, how are they as far as temperament? I'm fine with something snappy and bitey (although I would prefer not to get bitten of course xD).

Choosing a hatchling:
I am looking to get a young a snake as possible so I can immediately get to work on taming them without worrying about a larger snake biting me. I have heard that, unlike most snakes, Diamonds can look rather dull and unimpressive as hatchies. Personally I like the look of the wild-type green/yellow Diamonds, and was wondering if you guys have any tips or tricks in picking the best baby, or is it just a luck of the draw kind of thing?


General tips/tricks or suggestions would be much appreciated, thanks!
 

Pauls_Pythons

Very Well-Known Member
Trusted Seller
Enclosure:
Tall as they are arboreal and a medium sized python. My adults are in 6ft tall enclosures. 3ft wide by 2ft deep is the smallest of my adult enclosures, the largest is 4ft wide.

Heating:
All I can tell you is what works for me. There are other thoughts/methods employed but I give heat 4hrs a day generally. Hot spot of 32-35. My personal thoughts are that the dreaded DPS is brought on by husbandry including over heating. (That included too many hours of heating as a more likely cause than temperature alone).

Handling:
Fine. I have seen nasty tempered Diamonds but generally they are good tempered.

Choosing a hatchling:
Everyone likes something different but yes, Diamonds are quite plain as hatchies but brighten up with each shed. Its quite exciting seeing the development of a clutch of hatchies with each shed. My belief is they get to their best around 5-6 years old and start to lose some of their 'brightness' after age 10. Picking hatchies for colour is difficult so I look more at the rosette definition/size and the level of black they carry. Again this depends on size. Most breeders will have an idea of what the animals will look like but there are no guarantees.
 

pythoninfinite

Well-Known Member
APS Veteran
As far as picking a suitable baby, they can look very "carpety" after hatch, but the pattern changes less than colour does. If you want a "true" Diamond, look for a snake with small "rosettes" and not a strongly patterned animal - at least half the "Diamonds" pictured here are probably from Diamond/Intergrade/Coastal breedings, and really look more like Carpets than a south/central coast Diamond. There are keepers/breeders here who are very knowledgeable about good-looking Diamonds, PP (above), and cement come to mind. Buy from an acknowledged specialist rather than a back-yarder and you won't go far wrong - and if you can afford it, get one with 12 months of age on it, then you'll definitely know what you're getting.

Jamie
 

Buggster

Well-Known Member
Enclosure:
Tall as they are arboreal and a medium sized python. My adults are in 6ft tall enclosures. 3ft wide by 2ft deep is the smallest of my adult enclosures, the largest is 4ft wide.

Heating:
All I can tell you is what works for me. There are other thoughts/methods employed but I give heat 4hrs a day generally. Hot spot of 32-35. My personal thoughts are that the dreaded DPS is brought on by husbandry including over heating. (That included too many hours of heating as a more likely cause than temperature alone).

Handling:
Fine. I have seen nasty tempered Diamonds but generally they are good tempered.

Choosing a hatchling:
Everyone likes something different but yes, Diamonds are quite plain as hatchies but brighten up with each shed. Its quite exciting seeing the development of a clutch of hatchies with each shed. My belief is they get to their best around 5-6 years old and start to lose some of their 'brightness' after age 10. Picking hatchies for colour is difficult so I look more at the rosette definition/size and the level of black they carry. Again this depends on size. Most breeders will have an idea of what the animals will look like but there are no guarantees.

DPS is what has initially put me off keeping these pythons, but they are truly stunning animals and I am more than willing to change my husbandry to suit their needs.
I was wondering how you would set up your enclosure? My current pythons just have their UTH (Woma and Stimsons) and i've never felt the need to put in lights.

And just curious if your care for a hatchie would be different from that of an adult? Would you offer them more hours of heating, or your standard 4 hours?

Thanks for your response :)
 

pythoninfinite

Well-Known Member
APS Veteran
Treat hatchies like any other Carpet for the first year, and once they're big enough to thermoregulate a bit, you can adjust the temp regime to suit the species. No lights necessary if you don't want them

Jamie
 

Buggster

Well-Known Member
Treat hatchies like any other Carpet for the first year, and once they're big enough to thermoregulate a bit, you can adjust the temp regime to suit the species. No lights necessary if you don't want them

Jamie

By lights I meant heat lamps- sorry for the confusion.

Thanks for your response :)
 

Norm

Not so new Member
I agree with the advice given here by PP and Jamie. People get put off keeping diamonds because there's a misconception they're hard to care for but IMO they're the simplest of pythons to care for, and the most beautiful!
 

pythoninfinite

Well-Known Member
APS Veteran
I agree with the advice given here by PP and Jamie. People get put off keeping diamonds because there's a misconception they're hard to care for but IMO they're the simplest of pythons to care for, and the most beautiful!

Probably one of the most beautiful pythons in the world, but hugely underrated here on the east coast - like Water Dragons - a truly spectacular Agamid, but so common everyone takes them for granted over here. I've been here for 11 years now after moving from WA, but I'm still gobsmacked at how spectacular a large, dominant male EWD can be... and how common they are.

Jamie
 

Pauls_Pythons

Very Well-Known Member
Trusted Seller
I keep hatchies on 24/7 heat for the first year.
Brumation is a highly important part of all pythons life cycle and health care and as soon as possible after their first year they should commence a 'natural' life cycle.

As stated by Norm, Diamonds are particularly easy to keep by following basic husbandry rules. Many are kept in captivity for 20 years or more if they are provided for correctly.
Both Jamie & Norm touch on the beauty of these animals, so many variations in colour & pattern. If you want pure blood animals make sure you follow Jamies words of wisdom and talk to a reputable breeder. Many have been crossed with other carpets and later bred back to Diamonds.
 

Buggster

Well-Known Member
I keep hatchies on 24/7 heat for the first year.
Brumation is a highly important part of all pythons life cycle and health care and as soon as possible after their first year they should commence a 'natural' life cycle.

As stated by Norm, Diamonds are particularly easy to keep by following basic husbandry rules. Many are kept in captivity for 20 years or more if they are provided for correctly.
Both Jamie & Norm touch on the beauty of these animals, so many variations in colour & pattern. If you want pure blood animals make sure you follow Jamies words of wisdom and talk to a reputable breeder. Many have been crossed with other carpets and later bred back to Diamonds.

Really appreciate all the advice you all have been giving me :)

I was wondering what thermostat you use to keep your temps running for your Diamonds and how you only have it on for 4 hours a day.

my current heat mats have built-in thermostats and I run a seperate thermometer on top of them a small my back up. I leave them on 24/7, but I am wanting to switch the yearling onto a more natural heat cycle, however, in local pet shops even the most basic thermostat costs well over $200 and I don't want to dish out $200 for something which I know to have a long stream of bad reviews.

Also finding it hard to find an appropriate enclosure- obviously for an adult I want something big enough for it to climb around in.
The biggest enclosure I've found for sale (which was only 3f heigh) was almost reaching the 1k mark, which seems a bit ridiculous

i came across this avairy in my internet searches which outwardly appears to be a perfect enclosure.

https://www.bunnings.com.au/qiq-fix-1-5-x-0-8-x-1-5m-zinc-fowl-house-with-shelf_p3440101

What would you think of something like this? I would be keeping it indoors and would modify it to fit heat lamps and whatnot.
Obviously I would want to see it instore first to sus out any potential problems, but this just seems more reasonable (and better suited) for me.
One main concern I would have is with the metal of the aviary overheating, but given that it would be inside and I wouldn't be running 24/7 heat, I can't see it getting too bad.

Any thoughts?

- - - Updated - - -


Beautiful animal, how old is he?
 

Pauls_Pythons

Very Well-Known Member
Trusted Seller
I don't use thermostats with my adults or anything that goes onto a large enough enclosure.
I set the heat source to a size that will provide a hot spot around 32-35 and bang a timer on it. Its really that simple.

Currently I use a single globe for heat source, normally 60w but a couple use 75w. It all depends on the distance from the area you want to measure as the hot spot.
 

Gaboon

Not so new Member


Heating:
All I can tell you is what works for me. There are other thoughts/methods employed but I give heat 4hrs a day generally. Hot spot of 32-35. My personal thoughts are that the dreaded DPS is brought on by husbandry including over heating. (That included too many hours of heating as a more likely cause than temperature alone
.

so what your saying is, you can leave a rat in the gut of snake and leave it cold with no heat for 20 hours a day?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top