Feeding larger snakes

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by DeadCricket, Nov 2, 2011.

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  1. wokka

    wokka Guest

    It is best to quote weights if possible to avoid confusion. Rodentfarm medium Rabbits average 800 grams. I dont agree with your comment regarding more fat and any reserch i read does not support your comments. My initial question is - What makes you imply that fat is bad for snakes ? What percentage of fat is detrimental?
     
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  2. DeadCricket

    DeadCricket Well-Known Member

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    Surely they would require some fat in their diet having a little bit of fat on would help keep temps up too. Its true that our captive buddies don't have to actively hunt for food so therefore wouldn't need as much food but I really don't think they would be picky. If a hungry wild snake was on the hunt, anything warm enough and not too big for them, that walked past would be food. I don't imagine them stopping pre strike and thinking 'nah, I just don't feel like chicken tonight'. Plenty of instances of a snake eating a whole coop of chickens.

    Its true we must control their diet as they are still wild enough to eat everything that comes by them because in the wild they simply wouldn't know when their next meal was coming. I for one can't say I have ever seen an 'obese' snake. Personally I enjoy the thought of the reptiles I am responsible for feeling safe, warm and well fed. If the day comes that they start to look a bit too chubby and them favourite jeans just don't do up, well jenny craig is going to get an unusual call. Haha.

    Mammals, of edible size, without something clearly poisonous about them, eg a platypus, would be fair game IMHO. Birds, much the same.
     
  3. Rox.n.Lix

    Rox.n.Lix Subscriber Subscriber

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    My snake got fat. I over fed him one summer. He got put on a diet and now he is nice and lean and healthy. I would think for the exact reason that they arent as active as they would be in the wild, that fats should be avoided. I know reptiles are certainly not humans, but surely a sedantry human eating fatty food woul dget fat. why not a snake?
    just "food" for thought.... ;)
    I would think a duck would have more fat than chicken? Good point about cutting off the legs Wokka. Thanks. good point about 'growing' a duck for food, they sell chicks at the market for a few dollars.....
     
  4. Cockney_Red

    Cockney_Red Well-Known Member

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    my 8ft olives are on 400gm rabbits every 14 days, and growing well! not an ounce of fat on them, like steel cables...
     
  5. gti92dave

    gti92dave Not so new Member

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    feedin large snakes

    i feed my girl (coastal) g/pigs 2 xl g/pigs and in on em 4 over a year now .. my girl is over 5ft ... the g/pigs cost me $7 a hit and i get em off a breeder
     
  6. mattyg

    mattyg Active Member

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    [​IMG] Originally Posted by mattyg [​IMG]
    mediums there are 300-350 gram, a little bit bigger then a xl rat which is mostly fat.



    """It is best to quote weights if possible to avoid confusion. Rodentfarm medium Rabbits average 800 grams. I dont agree with your comment regarding more fat and any reserch i read does not support your comments. My initial question is - What makes you imply that fat is bad for snakes ? What percentage of fat is detrimental?"""



    dunno what percentage but u can see that xl rats that are just a adult rat with a side of 3 chins of fat. its just a matter of opinion but if ur a sponsor of rodentfarm i can see how you would want axe me down.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2011
  7. Rox.n.Lix

    Rox.n.Lix Subscriber Subscriber

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    I really would like to know about the fat or no fat thing. I have always been told rats past a certain size are just bulking up with fat.

    I think my theory about our captive snakes being less active = not burning energy ie fats very well. fat eaten as fat will more likely get stored as fat and only accessed during high activity. At least thats how it works in humans.... Are reptile metbolisms COMPLETELY different or not?.

    anyone???
     
  8. crocodile_dan

    crocodile_dan Well-Known Member

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    Rox.n.Lix metabolism is different between endotherms and ectotherms.
     
  9. wokka

    wokka Guest

    Fat deposition in rats will depend upon : age, sex, genetic strain, diet and there past life (breeding or not) ; but more importantly we dont know how much fat is desirable for snakes.
     
  10. DeadCricket

    DeadCricket Well-Known Member

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    Possibly my rats are labelled different but the Jumbo rats I get are notably bigger in frame etc. I will have to measure them but they are certainly larger in frame, not just fat. The guy who breeds them has most of them come from the line of 'Polar Bear', the largest white rat I've seen short of a wild rock rat. Good to hear g/pigs are a successful, sustainable source of food and $7 is a great price!
     
  11. Bloomster

    Bloomster Active Member

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    My understanding is that snakes that a general mammal/bird eaters in the wild( carpets) can process the fat better than reptile eaters in wild(bhp's, woma's) therefore you need to watch fat content you feed to bhp a lot more than carpets. Fatty liver disease seems to occur a lot more in the bhp's and woma's than carpets and olives.


    Sent from my HTC Sensation Z710a using Tapatalk
     
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