Heat light or ceramic heat emitter?

Discussion in 'Herp Help' started by JessTL, Oct 16, 2018.

  1. JessTL

    JessTL New Member

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    Hello,

    Newbie here. Well actually my daughter is the one that's done the research & getting snakes... I'm in charge of spending her money on equipment... she's not here to ask ATM tho.

    We are getting one(or maybe 2) Bredli pythons. Is it best to have a heat lamp that's a globe, or will the ceramic ones do?

    Do the ceramic ones emit UV? Can you turn off the light ones at night? If answer to those 2 questions is no, do we need one of each? Or a heat mat & globe...?

    TIA!
     
  2. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    you will get a mixed range of answers from CHE to Spotlights from bunnings

    I personally use a CHE connected to a thermostat that turns off at 4pm and back on at 8am

    most Pythons dont need UV from lights (no benefits to those with or without)

    Ceramics dont emit UV, but again, they arent needed.

    you will 99% of the time only need 1 heating item, For glass enclosures, heatmat/heat cord underneath is best, but only 1/3 or less covered

    make sure to get a cage if you decide on a CHE/globe, as they can get in excess of 150+c to the touch (my CHE gets to 250 if you put the temp gun aimed at it)
     
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  3. JessTL

    JessTL New Member

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    Thanks Bl69aze. And what strength CHE?

    We do have a glass enclosure(fish tank) but she didn't mention heat mats...
     
  4. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    i use a 75w which is overkill some days, even on a thermostat
     
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  5. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    If you like an unnatural, expensive and cumbersome option for heating, CHE are perfect!

    In terms of being practical/easy/cost efficient both in purchase price and ongoing running costs, heat cords are brilliant. If you want something more natural, heat cords under part of the floor and a heat lamp on for a few hours per day works really well, and help to encourage the natural behaviour of an arboreal desert species like bredli. It's not really essential and you'll keep them happy enough on floor heat alone, but I used to enjoy seeing my bredli up on their perch under the basking lamp (particularly in winter, where they'd spend the entire winter, pretty much 24/7 even though the lamp was only on for a few hours per day and they had access to floor heat, which is very much like what wild bredli do up in trees during winter).

    CHE are ridiculous. Not only are they expensive, prone to breaking, impractical and difficult to work with, but they're completely unnatural. There is no natural heat source in the sky which radiates heat without light. Lights are more natural and much cheaper. If you want a non light-emitting option, heat cords are more natural and much cheaper. CHE also look uglier and snakes sometimes burn themselves on them. (slightly less likely with a light because it's emitting bright light).

    UV is pointless at best, harmful at worst. Some snakes are scared by it and go off their feed, once in a while there are cases of reptiles being burned by UV.
     
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  6. JessTL

    JessTL New Member

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    Thanks for that Sdaji. So are the running costs of the CHE's more exxy? Because it seems that they're about the same price as globes. And ditto for the heat cords as opposed to the lamps, if you say they're cheaper - they are more expensive to buy though? (Just going off Ebay - Aus only - products). What is the effective difference between the heat cords & heat mats(which are a fair bit cheaper)?
     
  7. Bl69aze

    Bl69aze Very Well-Known Member

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    theres an ongoing debate that heatmats should not be used because a couple of people have had a house fire from them (most likely cheap imitations(you get what you pay for) ), i have used them and give enough airflow underneath, so they are not cramped.

    heat cords you can route where you want to heat, but for under a glass tank you will just be doing an up down up down pattern
     
  8. Sdaji

    Sdaji Almost Legendary

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    The running costs (electricity) of CHE are about the same as spotlights. Heat cords (or mats) are much, much cheaper and more efficient with electricity. Purchase price of globes is far cheaper than CHE, unless you're buying expensive name brand specialty reptile ones (don't ask me why anyone would, the only reason it happens is clever marketting to the naive sector of the market). Heat cords are far more versatile than heat mats, although depending on how you set them up and what you're using them for, heat mats can be easier to set up (simply put a flat heat mat under an enclosure and bang, you're done). I love racks, and heat cords are incredibly efficient with them; one cord can heat up to several dozen tubs depending on the variables. Heat mats can't compete with that. For your situation, it sounds like you're just wanting to set up one bredli enclosure, so perhaps a heat mat would be easiest. Over the last 25 years I've experimented with more heating and wiring options and more enclosure types than I could list, and I've never accidentally started a fire, but perhaps jokes aside I have a basic level of common sense some people lack. I haven't played with heat mats for around 10 years so can't recommend any of the current brands/models. I have often used heat mats and cords with no airflow, often completely sealed up. Around 15 years ago I built elaborate enclosures with routed floors, heat cords put into the grooves, and glass siliconed in place over the top, totally sealed up. They worked beautifully but were a lot of work to build and quite heavy, and I'd go for easier options now. Still, no fires or dangerous heat build up. I've also used plenty of heat mats in between stacked enclosures, sandwiched between the wooden floor/top of the enclosures they're between. Again, after about 10-15 years with often heaps of them in use, no issues. Usually when I see cases of fires there's an obvious cause which makes me roll my eyes.

    For me personally, setting up a bredli enclosure would either come down to an extremely simple setup of a tub in a rack with floor heat only, or (preferably, especially if I wanted it to look nicer, which I assume you do) something around 4' long, 2' high and 2' deep with around a 1' square area of floor heat at one end (a little larger won't hurt, but keep it to one end of the enclosure and no more than about a quarter or maybe third of the floor area), and a heat lamp (with visible light, just the regular type you'd find at a hardware store) positioned directly above the heated floor area. Put a perch of whatever type you like directly under the heat lamp and a hide below that over the heated floor area, and another hide at the cool end. You can add extra perches/climbing branches if you like. Only use the basking lamp during daylight hours (it simulates warm sunlight) and use the floor heat any time day or night you want them to have heat (when they want to be warm at night, the only option is a warm ground, there is no sun).

    Bredli are actually pretty easy to keep in a way which will make them really happy and spend a lot of time perched in a place which makes them visible to you.
     

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