Reptile Photography

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by Poggle, Mar 28, 2012.

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  1. RileysGeckos

    RileysGeckos Active Member

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    Is this your crested gecko and if it is I didn't think you where allowed to keep them in Australia? and its a stunning photo by the way!!!!cheers riley
     
  2. Sezzzzzzzzz

    Sezzzzzzzzz Very Well-Known Member

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    the OP is from denmark :)
     
  3. DaReptileBoy

    DaReptileBoy Well-Known Member

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    what tipe of snake is the first one
     
  4. Smithers

    Smithers Very Well-Known Member

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  5. Damiieen

    Damiieen Well-Known Member

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    Brazillian Rainbow Boa, I think :s

    Can't keep in Aus.
     
  6. bohdi13

    bohdi13 Well-Known Member

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    I am just getting into reptile and other wildlife photography and I am planning on getting a Nikon D3100 twin lense kit; 18-55mm & 70-300mm lenses.
    I am curious whether too how much it will cost for lighting on the camera if I need others besides the pop up one it already has.
    And I am also wondering what else I will need to magnificently photograph reptiles?

    Cheers, Bohdi.
     
  7. sara_sabian

    sara_sabian Subscriber Subscriber

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    That's a complicated question.

    Your best approach is to do some research, and then some more.

    It depends on what style of photography you're interested in, how versatile you want your set up to be. I do a lot of studio stuff and mostly use continuous lighting. I also use some flash guns and ring flashes from time to time.

    Entry level flash guns are relatively inexpensive, they are a good place to start and you can upgrade as you go. As your skills develop, so will your requirements.

    A lot of photographers steer away from using the on board flash. It kills detail and makes photos flat and lifeless. You just have to use what you've got, effectively.
     
  8. Red-Ink

    Red-Ink Very Well-Known Member

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    You don't really need too much fancy eqipment to do photography (it helps)... sometimes a camera, a log, a snake and some sunhine is all it takes.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. rvcasa

    rvcasa Well-Known Member

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    Peruvian Rainbow Boa?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  10. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    Rainbow serpent, aren't they in our indigenous culture? lol
     
  11. Barrett

    Barrett Well-Known Member

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    The 'rainbow serpent' that gets noted in our indigenous culture is believed to be the water python as it often has a rainbow sheen to it's scales. Rainbow 'Boa' is not native.
     
  12. rvcasa

    rvcasa Well-Known Member

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    Practice!
    Lots and lots of practice.

    There's no point buying a Nikon D4 w/ the new $8k f/2.8 ED VR lens, if you don't know how to use it.

    Ideally, if possible, you should have at least a macro lens (ie 90mm 1:1 macro) and a dedicated macro strobes...

    If not, use what you have, practice for a while till you're ready to invest more skills and $$$ in more advanced lens/flashes etc.

    Hope this helps? Cheers :)


    P.S. google how to build your own macro lens.
    You'll need a black painted tube roll and you'll also need to sacrifice 1-2 rear lens cover - total cost aprox. 10-20 bucks.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  13. SteveNT

    SteveNT Very Well-Known Member

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    Here's some I took with a D3100 + 18-55 lens using the on-board flash.

    DSC_0172_edited-1.jpg DSC_0177_edited-1.jpg DSC_0192_edited-1.jpg DSC_0203_edited-1.jpg DSC_0205_edited-1.jpg

    I have my replacement D90 now and a few new lenses. (the last camera decided on a swim in Bynoe Harbour, I got it back but it's just a paperweight now.)
     
  14. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    Yeah mate I know and that is why I put "lol" at the end just in case my sarcasim was not conveyed through written words.
     
  15. Barrett

    Barrett Well-Known Member

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    Fair deuce lol, my bad.
     
  16. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    There is a lot of posts misconstrued on this forum due to the lack of body language and facial expressions and I have been caught out like this as well.
     
  17. Smithers

    Smithers Very Well-Known Member

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  18. n3xia

    n3xia Active Member

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    Anyone can have good equipment, but you've gotta know how to use it as well ;)

    To the OP, not sure if it's already been said as I don't have time to read through the whole thread, but turn your flash off! Either take photos during the day only, or get an external flash that won't cast harsh shadows like that. Some of them are reasonably priced. Here's a guide I wrote a few years ago that might help you make the most out of low light situations.
     
  19. Red-Ink

    Red-Ink Very Well-Known Member

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    Nothing wrong with having the flash on even in daylight. In fact I would say that when in harsh high contrast situations like bright sunlight where the highlight values are too far apart from the shadow details... pop up flash on the camera is your best friend.

    No flash in daylight... camera metering will always expose for correct highlight value. Regardless if it's a DSLR on full manual or a point and shoot auto.

    Decently exposed highlights... tad under for the in "shade".

    [​IMG]

    Pop up flash on the camera switched on in combination with ambient daylight.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2013
  20. bradles73au

    bradles73au Not so new Member

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    Some pics of shadow
     

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