some help with my diamond please

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by chris_brown, May 15, 2013.

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  1. chris_brown

    chris_brown Active Member

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    Hey guys so i got a diamond python recently and she's only around 3months old when i first got her she was coming out of her hide infact barley hiding.. the first time i tried to feed her she didnt eat, left it a week or so second time took it like a fat kid taking cake, waiting another week tried to feed her and she snapped at it but didnt take it, and after her first feed she has always been in her hide,and she has gotten a tad bit aggressive im assuming that cause she hasnt eaten and must be very hungry, i thought she might be shedding the first couple of days skin looked very dull now the skin looks brand new. i know just before they shed the skin get very clear but i never ever saw milky eyes etc etc
    what are your thoughts?
    ps: she does have a UV lights on during 7am-5pm, warm side is around 27-30 cold side is around 23-25
     
  2. JezJez

    JezJez Active Member

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    I'd say due for a shed so just leave it be. They'll go dull and milky coloured eyes and belly for a few days then that goes away, a few days to week after that is generally when they will shed. You can offer food then.
     
  3. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    Try bumping up your hot spot to 30-33.
     
  4. Skeptic

    Skeptic Well-Known Member

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    27 - 30 is fine for a Diamond
     
  5. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    In my book (Keeping and Breeding Australian Pythons) it states that a higher body temperature is preferred whilst digesting food and suggest 32-35 degrees. I usually have a hot spot of about 33 degrees in my large enclosure and the rest is just ambient room temperature and my diamond x coastal is fine.
     
  6. Skeptic

    Skeptic Well-Known Member

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    Intergrades and diamonds aren't the same thing. A diamond will eat and digest at 30 degrees and less without blinking. (not that snakes blink :))

    It could be that the snake is about to slough as the OP thought or any number of other things but I doubt it's temp related.
     
  7. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    The quote from the book was for pure diamond pythons.
     
  8. Skeptic

    Skeptic Well-Known Member

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    I wasn't contesting that.

    In my experience of keeping diamonds for over a decade, they will eat at lower temps than intergrades. I treat my intergrades like any other carpet but diamonds don't do well when kept the same.
     
  9. sharky

    sharky Very Well-Known Member

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    Diamonds come from a cooler termperature climate then other species. I have known people who have had their snakes die from overheating when temps were at 33degrees. I agree with Skeptic, 27-30 degrees (not taking sides or anything) is in range of their natural habitat. Because of their skin colour they absorb heat much faster and keep their body temperature higher than most.
     
  10. chris_brown

    chris_brown Active Member

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    yeah she shed today and offered a feed hesitated at first but then ate it like a killa im giving her fuzzy mice but i have a feeling bumping the food up a tad bit might help shes around 3 months now and after the shed i stated loving her more looks soo good :D
     
  11. Tobe404

    Tobe404 Well-Known Member

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    Glad she took the food for you. Chuck up pic up. Would love to see her. :)
     
  12. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    I am not arguing with Skeptics experience with diamonds that 27-30 works but was just stating what was in my book as I had nothing other to go by. The other thing is that I would think that in the diamond region that spots in the sun would get hotter than 30 degrees and if the snake does not like this they will move to a cooler area just like in an enclosure.
     
  13. Gruni

    Gruni Very Well-Known Member

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    In their natural range at this time of year the ambient temps won't get that high but rocks will warm up and so long as there is a heat tile where they can go to thermoregulate then the ambient temp doesn't need to be that high. His snake has shed and is back on the tucker but it could just as easily have been starting to go into winter mode as most Diamonds (as I understand it) don't look at food over winter anyway.
     
  14. Brodie

    Brodie Very Well-Known Member

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    Andynic, that sounds like a great way to induce DPS. 27-30 is the way to go.
     
  15. Bart70

    Bart70 Well-Known Member

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    Ok....I am going to ask a silly question (and not interested in the Diamond/Intergrade debate as I have my own opinion in that area) seeing that this thread has touched on the subject.

    I have a young python that I am confident from its markings and viewing its parents is a genuine Intergrade from what I am able to determine. I am confident it is not a 'rebranded' Intergrade (ie - One bred by somebody crossing a Diamond with a Coastal and calling it an Intergrade) and its markings are quite removed from what I would classify as a Diamond.

    As this snake grows and develops - Should my husbandry reflect that of a Diamond?......or should I treat it more like most other Carpets?

    Happy to accept that Diamonds like things a little cooler etc...This guy seems to behave more like a Diamond in terms of how 'he' prefers to thermoregulate himself - often spending nights on his skewers at the cold end of his tub whilst others at the same temp are cosily curled up tightly in their warm hides. Both of his parents live outside in an aviary type enclosure without any heating (On the Mid North Coast in Intergrade heartland).

    My observations of his behaviour are that he is more Diamond like in his temperature preferences......Interested to hear constructive thoughts on how I should raise him.

    EDIT: Also worth noting that he has started to behave strangely in terms of feeding......His latest trick for the last few weeks is to get all wound up as if he is starving, hit a mouse like lightning.....then decide after playing for 10 minutes that he does not really want it and goes sits on his skewers again! Perhaps signs that he is slowing down for winter?
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2013
  16. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    I am believing in what the experienced people are saying but am also wondering firstly what the wild pythons do when the hot sunny area rises above 30 degrees ( I am assuming just move into cooler area) and secondly what would the people in FNQ and NT do when they have ambient extended temperatures above 30 degrees through summer. I am not saying you , Skeptic and Sharky are wrong just wanting my questions answered as I am intrigued.
     
  17. Brodie

    Brodie Very Well-Known Member

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    As you say, they move on. Read Ric shines study on the natural history of diamond pythons, its very interesting. I have kept diamonds since I was 16, my snake rooms had air conditioning so that I could maintain a temp gradient in my enclosures. ;-). Well, most of them anyways.

    Your input is appreciated BTW, you have helped many people on this forum, I just disagree with you in this instance,.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2013
  18. andynic07

    andynic07 Very Well-Known Member

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    Never really thought about people having to have reptiles in air conditioned rooms to be able to provide gradients. Do you had problems with extended power outages during cyclones and the such? I am usually open to being corrected if there is logical points made so I appreciate learning from experience as books can only teach you so much. Thanks for the compliment as well mate.
     
  19. Brodie

    Brodie Very Well-Known Member

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    I did have problems yes, especially in Darwin. Power up there would go out with every storm. Thankfully after 2006, I was living with my parents who had generator setup to come on as soon as the power went out. I kept tiger snakes and RBBS in my caravan back then! The tigers didn't do too well to be honest, but the hoplos and diamonds did. Not sure why as I had a dehumidifier as well.

    In cairns the power rarely goes out :)
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2013
  20. Skeptic

    Skeptic Well-Known Member

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    I wasn't 100% sure but I didn't think DPS was a problem with intergrades. I haven't been keeping intergrades as long as I have diamonds and never really looked into it. But your question got me thinking so I did a little research. Theres a lot of differing opinions and not all that much info but it seems that intergrades certainly are susceptible to DPS.

    Andynic you hit the nail on the head when you said, "spots in the sun would get hotter than 30 degrees and if the snake does not like this they will move to a cooler area just like in an enclosure". They won't drop dead at 30 degrees but you need to ensure that they can have access to areas no hotter than 25 degrees for as long as they want. Also, Diamonds should only be given around 4 - 6 hrs of basking time through the day at temps 28-29 and no heat at night. I'm guessing Bart70 that this would be applicable to intergrades as well. Someone more experienced with intergrades might be able to confirm this?
     
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