The cons of owning a python

Discussion in 'Australian Snakes' started by sammilouise, Jun 2, 2016.

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  1. sammilouise

    sammilouise New Member

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    Hi all
    I don't think this topic has been posted before and everyone here obviously loves their pets but.. Are there any downsides to owning a python?
    I would really love a python and I've done my research. I've filled out the wildlife forms which are really to post. Have your say because it would be really helpful.


    Cheers
     
  2. saximus

    saximus Almost Legendary

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    Off the top of my head:

    • Most common downside - you won't be able to stop at one and, before you know it, you will have a big collection that takes all your time and money ;).
    • The second people find out you're a snake owner, you will be bombarded by stupid/ignorant questions and comments.
    • Snake poo stinks and, if you choose a big species, you will be shocked by how much horrendous excrement can come from one animal.
    • Despite what new keepers try to suggest, they don't have personality like more common domestic pets so don't expect something that will return your affectionate cuddles.
    • Health issues, although rare, can be very difficult to diagnose and treat because they won't show that anything is wrong until something has fully set in.
    • They bite.
     
  3. Tinky

    Tinky Very Well-Known Member

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    Depending on your age, (ie if you are over about 35), you dating options will be seriously limited.

    Young people seem to be more accepting of reptile pets, however oldies can be recalcitrant.
     
  4. pinefamily

    pinefamily Subscriber Subscriber

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    I agree with everything above. Plus it's a long term pet. Most pythons will live 20 to 25 years.

    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
     
  5. Raymonde

    Raymonde Active Member

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    Not many people will look after them when you go away, although they can manage without looking after for short periods of time
     
  6. alichamp

    alichamp Active Member

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    I don't own a python I own a blue tongue, here are my thoughts on owning a reptile:

    - they are REALLY different to mammals (whose care is probably more intuitive because they are more similar to us) so to keep them you need to constantly read and learn about them - I actually see is as a pro but I guess some will see it as a con

    - they can take you or leave you, as long as they have their basic needs met they don't seek out your attention - again a positive for me because they are low maintenance probably a con for some

    - they will keep to themselves and hide away a lot of the time

    - you work to their needs and their schedule rather than yours, which means there will be times you want them to entertain you but they have other ideas.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Perhaps the feeding requirements of a python can contain cons...?
     
  7. Iguana

    Iguana Well-Known Member

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    -The food. This is depending on how big the snake is (small snakes aren't really an issue). Unless you breed your own rodents, buying them will cost a fair amount. Also, defrosting rats sucks, they tend to smell.
     
  8. alichamp

    alichamp Active Member

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    And you need a space in the freezer to keep frozen rats.
     
  9. Raymonde

    Raymonde Active Member

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    I used to agree with this, then i thought about how much it would cost per month to buy dog or cat food for the equivalent number of animals and i actually think snakes are cheaper than dogs or cats. It seems like a lot because most people buy in bulk. Although, I do only have 2 snakes so I am sure its a much bigger issue for people with 5 or 10 or more snakes. (then again imagine the amount of food needed for 5 or 10 dogs.....)
     
  10. saximus

    saximus Almost Legendary

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    Agreed.

    1 rat per adult snake per 2-4 weeks over 7 months = 7-14 rats per year. At $5 per rat, that's $35-$70 a year.
     
  11. Iguana

    Iguana Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I agree with you on the point that dog/cat food is much more expensive (good quality food anyway) and especially for many dogs/cats. But for just a snake alone, a big one like an olive, Bredli, BHP or coastal, for one meal for adult is 20-25 at most pet stores. And for a student or someone without a job, it can seem like alot, maybe for someone with a well paying job and only one snake, not so much.

    Also worth noting that a person with a single snake may not buy in bulk, usually meaning the rats are more costly for each individual.
     
  12. Burgo89

    Burgo89 Active Member

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    When they shut down for winter and you don't see them for months on end
     
  13. Tinky

    Tinky Very Well-Known Member

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    It is not a mattter of if you will get bitten, it is a matter or when, (and you will bleed alot, but will also have some great photos).

    Having said that I have only been bitten twice, and both times it was my mistake. Nips from snappy little hatchies don't count.
     
  14. sammilouise

    sammilouise New Member

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    These have been really helpful. In regards to their excrement.. is it correct that you can record their rate of digestion and avoid bringing them out of the enclosure on say day 5 after they've eaten so they don't crap in your house? I'm looking at a 5 year old bredli who is about 3m who's previously been used for talks at schools so hopefully he's out of his bitey phase
     
  15. SKYWLKR

    SKYWLKR Active Member

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    Why that particular snake and one thats already reached adulthood? My 2 cents is that for a brand new first timer, you'd get way more enjoyment and learning experience if you went for something alot younger and easier to care for. I know that an adult Bredli would have a certain 'wow' factor to show off to your friends and family etc, but so would a yearling that grows with you and you it (if that makes sense?)
     
  16. Toska

    Toska Not so new Member

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    I've had my Noodle for just over a year and I only just started getting this.

    I was asked by someone being totally serious last weekend if I had her teeth removed...


    The one thing that most people see as a down side with Noodle is that being nocturnal she is usually tucked up in one of her hides asleep when they want to see/hold her and I refuse to drag her out of her hide so they can. Despite being a beautiful animal she isn't the most exciting creature to watch even when she is out since she does most of her exploring and moving about when we're in bed and all the lights are out.
     
  17. sammilouise

    sammilouise New Member

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    That makes sense. This snake needs to be rehomed and I know he eats well. His owner also said he is great for handling and has been used for presentations. It what ways would a younger snake be easier? Other than general size and handling..
     
  18. JackTheHerper

    JackTheHerper Well-Known Member

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    Try Owning 3 Rottweilers :lol:
     
  19. pythoninfinite

    pythoninfinite Subscriber Subscriber

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    A big snake or 3 Rotties still don't smell as bad as one medium Bluey... How people keep them in their bedrooms I have no idea :shock:!

    Jamie
     
  20. alexbee

    alexbee Not so new Member

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    Personally i wouldnt go for the 3m bredli if i was you.. sure some snakes may not bite so much but if you pick them up at the wrong time they will, and a 3m bredli will hurt... get a hatchie and you will learn to read the animals and learn how to handle as it grows
     
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